Publique, venda, compre, baixe partituras e direitos de execução musical!
   
 
 
 
 

In the Fire of Images: Three Etudes (2002) for alto saxophone and piano

Clássico/Peça • 2002
 
     
 

In the Fire of Images: Three Etudes (2002) for alto saxophone and piano

Título por Autor: Carson Cooman: In the Fire of Images: Three Etudes (2002) for alto saxophone and piano


16.95 USD

vendedor Musik Fabrik
PDF, 473.5 Kb ID: SM-000295272 data do carregamento: 25 ago 2017
Instrumentação
Piano, Saxophone alto
Composição para
Solo, Piano de Acompanhamento
Tipo de composição
Score for two performers, Parte de solo
movimento(s)
1 para 3 de 3
Editora
Musik Fabrik
dificuldade
Medium
duração
10'0
I. Capriccio
II. Cortege
III. Catastrophe

In the Fire of Images: Three Etudes (2002) for alto saxophone and piano was written for and is dedicated to saxophonist Paul Wehage. The work was commissioned by Maurice and Amy Katz. The title comes from a line in a poem by George Mackay Brown. The line provided the inspiration for the extra-musical trajectory of the work.

The three movements are etudes that focus primarily on aspects of rhythm – particularly asymmetrical rhythmic groupings contained within straightforward measure divisions. Within the piano part, the use of ostinati plays a large role in the construction of each etude. Overall rhythmic patterns and sequences are shared between the three etudes.

The first etude, Capriccio, presents an ostinato pattern in the piano based on a series of pitch sets. The saxophone explores this material over the top of the ostinato in a variety of lyric gestures.

The second etude, Cortege, explores ideas of additive, augmenting, and transforming melody. A series of descending chords in the piano provides a harmonic support to the saxophone’s very long-breathed melodies.

The third etude, Catastrophe, has the feeling of “something gone terribly wrong.” An optimistic and lively melody is presented in the beginning only to give way quickly to feelings of great unrest – chords do not change at their expected time, and the saxophone ends up in severe rhythmic displacement. A brief and rhythmically crazed cadenza leads to the conclusion. The original music attempts to be recalled, fails, and an enigmatic and hammered coda brings the movement to an unsettling close.
  • comentários
   
     
 
 
   
 
0:00
00:00