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The Tale of Tsar Saltan. Opera • Flight of the Bumblebee

Classical • Alternative Title: El vuelo del moscardón
 
 
   
 

For voice and piano

Title by uploader: Flight of the bumblebee (voice and piano)


Free

PDF, 537.9 Kb ID: SM-000075240 Upload date: 18 Aug 2011
Instrumentation
Piano, Voice
Scored for
Duo
Type of score
Piano-vocal score
Language
German, Russian
Difficulty
Difficult
Original version: voice and piano. Please visit http://olcbarcelonamusic.load.cd to get more sheet music. Contact us at olopcallmusic@hotmail.com
  • Comments

For russian folk orchestra

Title by uploader: Flight of the Bumblebee from The Tale of Tsar Saltan


Free

Uploader Library
PDF, 1.34 Mb ID: SM-000002267 Upload date: 21 Feb 2005
Instrumentation
Balalaika, Domra
Scored for
Russian folk orchestra
Type of score
Full score
Publisher
Library
Language
Russian
Difficulty
Difficult
Genre
Classical/Arrangement
  • Comments

For flute and piano – flute part

Title by uploader: Flight of the Bumblebee, for Flute and Piano – Flute Part


1.45 USD

Seller PlaceArt
PDF, 326.8 Kb ID: SM-000040088 Upload date: 08 Oct 2010
Instrumentation
Flute
Scored for
Solo
Type of score
Solo part
Key
F minor
Difficulty
Advanced
Genre
Classical/Arrangement
  • Comments

For flute and piano

Title by uploader: Flight of the Bumble Bee, for Flute and Piano


Free

Uploader PlaceArt
PDF, 187.8 Kb ID: SM-000040089 Upload date: 08 Oct 2010
Instrumentation
Piano, Flute
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers
Key
F minor
Publisher
PlaceArt
Difficulty
Advanced
Genre
Classical/Arrangement
  • Comments

For flute and piano

Title by uploader: Flight of the Bumblebee in F Minor, for Flute and Piano


1.45 USD

Seller PlaceArt
PDF, 704.2 Kb ID: SM-000071586 Upload date: 23 Jun 2011
Instrumentation
Piano, Flute
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Solo part
Key
F minor
Difficulty
Advanced
Genre
Classical/Chamber music
  • Comments

For piano

Title by uploader: Flight of the Bumblebee, for Piano


1.45 USD

Seller PlaceArt
PDF, 413.9 Kb ID: SM-000071587 Upload date: 23 Jun 2011
Instrumentation
Piano
Scored for
Solo
Type of score
For a single performer
Key
F minor
Difficulty
Advanced
Genre
Classical/Chamber music
  • Comments

For flute and piano – flute part

Title by uploader: Flight of the Bumblebee in A Minor, for Flute and Piano – Flute Part


1.45 USD

Seller PlaceArt
PDF, 242.5 Kb ID: SM-000071595 Upload date: 23 Jun 2011
Instrumentation
Flute
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Solo part
Key
A minor
Difficulty
Advanced
Genre
Classical/Chamber music
  • Comments

For flute and piano

Title by uploader: Flight of the Bumblebee in A Minor, for Flute and Piano


1.45 USD

Seller PlaceArt
PDF, 419.8 Kb ID: SM-000071606 Upload date: 23 Jun 2011
Instrumentation
Piano, Flute
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers
Key
A minor
Difficulty
Advanced
Genre
Classical/Chamber music
  • Comments

For oboe and piano

Title by uploader: Flight of the bumblebee (oboe/soloist and piano)


4.00 USD

PDF, 439.2 Kb ID: SM-000075241 Upload date: 18 Aug 2011
Instrumentation
Piano, Oboe
Scored for
Duo
Type of score
Score for two performers
Arranger
Paul Siguir
Difficulty
Difficult
This is scored for oboe and piano. However, the oboe part can be played by any C instrument.
Visit http://olcbarcelonamusic.load.cd for more sheet music.
  • Comments

For piano

Title by uploader: Flight of the Bumblebee R. Korsakov

Read license
2.00 USD

PDF, 225.0 Kb ID: SM-000254868 Upload date: 03 Sep 2016
Instrumentation
Piano
Scored for
Solo
Type of score
For a single performer
Arranger
Takahiko Saito
Publisher
Takahiko Saito
Difficulty
Advanced
Genre
Classical/Arrangement
Bearbeitung von Takahiko Saito
  • Comments

For piano

Title by uploader: Flight of the Bumblebee


2.00 USD

PDF, 224.6 Kb ID: SM-000269128 Upload date: 26 Jan 2017
Instrumentation
Piano
Scored for
Solo
Type of score
Piano score
Arranger
Takahiko Saito
Publisher
Takahiko Saito
Difficulty
Medium
Duration
1'30
Year of composition
2016
Genre
Classical/Arrangement
Leichte Fassung
  • Comments

For guitar

Title by uploader: Flight of the bumblebee


Free

Uploader Altai
PDF, 282.0 Kb ID: SM-000270680 Upload date: 06 Feb 2017
Instrumentation
Classical guitar
Scored for
Solo
Type of score
For a single performer
Arranger
Altai
Publisher
Altai
Genre
Classical/Instrumental
обработка шутка для виртуозного исполнения на гитаре
  • Comments

For saxophones

Title by uploader: N. Rimsky - Korsakov. Flight of the Bumblebee

Read license
20.00 USD

PDF, 750.4 Kb ID: SM-000307114 Upload date: 05 Nov 2017
Instrumentation
Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Soprano Saxophone
Type of score
Full score, Parts
Key
G minor
Arranger
Valerya Vinogradova
Difficulty
Advanced
Duration
1'30
Genre
Classical/Instrumental
It is an arrangement for saxophone orchestra (12 instruments).
  • Comments

For piano solo

Title by uploader: Rimsky-Korsakov - The Flight of the Bumblebee - piano solo

Read license
4.95 USD

Seller Peter Petrof
PDF, 646.7 Kb ID: SM-000492634 Upload date: 07 May 2020
Instrumentation
Piano
Scored for
Solo
Type of score
Piano score
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Arranger
Peter Petrof
Publisher
Peter Petrof
Difficulty
Difficult
Duration
2'0
Genre
Classical/Instrumental
  • Comments

For Alto Clarinet & Piano

Title by uploader: Korsakov: Flight of the Bumblebee for Alto Clarinet and Piano

Read license
19.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.10 Mb ID: SM-000508581 Upload date: 25 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Alto Clarinet
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Difficult
Duration
1'15
Year of composition
1900
Genre
Classical/Piece
Flight of the Bumblebee from Korsakov's "Tale of Tsar Saltan" Score: 9 pages, Solo part: 3 pages, Piano accompaniment part: 3 pages. Duration: ca. 1:15 Amaze your listeners with this short but stunning recital encore!

Flight of the Bumblebee is, to be sure, an orchestral interlude composed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for his opera The Tale of Tsar Saltan. Korsakov, of course, intended to musically portray the chaotic flying pattern of a bumblebee. Nowadays, this piece is one of the comparatively more famous classical works because it frequently appears from time to time in popular culture. In the opera, the piece appears notably at the close of Act III, Tableau 1. This is when the magic Swan-Bird, in fact, changes the Prince (the son of the Tsar) into a bee so he can fly away to visit his father. Interestingly, at this point in the drama, his father, in effect, does not know that he is alive.


Korsakov Background
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844 –1908) was a uniquely famous composer from Russia. He was likewise a member of an infamous assembly of composers called The Five. Korsakov was furthermore an expert in orchestration. His correspondingly most famous orchestral compositions—Capriccio Espagnol, the Russian Easter Festival Overture, and the Scheherazade suite—are important monuments of the standard music repertoire. Also, comparatively very important are his suites and excerpts from his 15 operas. Korsakov was moreover fond of using Russian folklore and fairy tales in his music, such as Scheherazade.

Nationalistic Style
Korsakov believed, similarly to fellow outspoken composer Balakirev, in creating a nationalistic, Russia-centric style of classical music. The new style was in fact called “Orientalism.” It similarly relied on native Russian materials, exotic scales, and experimental harmonic, melodic and rhythmic procedures. This practice, conversely, ran counter to the developments in Western musical culture.

Musical Developments
Nevertheless, Korsakov developed an appreciation of Western musical techniques after he became a professor of musical composition, harmony, and orchestration at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1871. Moreover, he undertook a rigorous three-year program of self-education and mastered Western methods, incorporating them in conjunction with the influences of Mikhail Glinka and other members of The Five. His techniques of composition and orchestration were additionally enriched by his exposure to the works of Richard Wagner.

Naval Service
Korsakov combined his music career accordingly with a career in the Russian military. He was in the first place an officer in the Russian Navy. In due time, he was appointed as a civilian Inspector of Naval Bands. As a result, Korsakov expanded his knowledge of woodwind and brass playing, which in turn heightened his capabilities in orchestration.

Legacy
Korsakov in due time contributed a significant number of Russian nationalist works. He also prepared, from time to time, compositions by The Five for presentation. This brought their works straightaway into the active classical repertoire as well. He also shaped an entire generation of younger composers during his time as a music educator. Therefore, music historians consider Korsakov as the foremost engineer of what the public considers to be the Russian style of composition. He served, all in all, as a transitional figure between The Five and the classically trained composers who became the norm over time. In addition to the Russians, he forthwith influenced non-Russian composers such as Ravel, Debussy, Dukas, and Respighi.
  • Comments

For Alto Sax & Piano

Title by uploader: Korsakov: Flight of the Bumblebee for Alto Sax and Piano

Read license
19.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.10 Mb ID: SM-000508582 Upload date: 25 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Alto Saxophone
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Difficult
Duration
1'15
Year of composition
1900
Genre
Classical/Piece
Flight of the Bumblebee from Korsakov's "Tale of Tsar Saltan" Score: 9 pages, Solo part: 3 pages, Piano accompaniment part: 3 pages. Duration: ca. 1:15 Amaze your listeners with this short but stunning recital encore!

Flight of the Bumblebee is, to be sure, an orchestral interlude composed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for his opera The Tale of Tsar Saltan. Korsakov, of course, intended to musically portray the chaotic flying pattern of a bumblebee. Nowadays, this piece is one of the comparatively more famous classical works because it frequently appears from time to time in popular culture. In the opera, the piece appears notably at the close of Act III, Tableau 1. This is when the magic Swan-Bird, in fact, changes the Prince (the son of the Tsar) into a bee so he can fly away to visit his father. Interestingly, at this point in the drama, his father, in effect, does not know that he is alive.


Korsakov Background
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844 –1908) was a uniquely famous composer from Russia. He was likewise a member of an infamous assembly of composers called The Five. Korsakov was furthermore an expert in orchestration. His correspondingly most famous orchestral compositions—Capriccio Espagnol, the Russian Easter Festival Overture, and the Scheherazade suite—are important monuments of the standard music repertoire. Also, comparatively very important are his suites and excerpts from his 15 operas. Korsakov was moreover fond of using Russian folklore and fairy tales in his music, such as Scheherazade.

Nationalistic Style
Korsakov believed, similarly to fellow outspoken composer Balakirev, in creating a nationalistic, Russia-centric style of classical music. The new style was in fact called “Orientalism.” It similarly relied on native Russian materials, exotic scales, and experimental harmonic, melodic and rhythmic procedures. This practice, conversely, ran counter to the developments in Western musical culture.

Musical Developments
Nevertheless, Korsakov developed an appreciation of Western musical techniques after he became a professor of musical composition, harmony, and orchestration at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1871. Moreover, he undertook a rigorous three-year program of self-education and mastered Western methods, incorporating them in conjunction with the influences of Mikhail Glinka and other members of The Five. His techniques of composition and orchestration were additionally enriched by his exposure to the works of Richard Wagner.

Naval Service
Korsakov combined his music career accordingly with a career in the Russian military. He was in the first place an officer in the Russian Navy. In due time, he was appointed as a civilian Inspector of Naval Bands. As a result, Korsakov expanded his knowledge of woodwind and brass playing, which in turn heightened his capabilities in orchestration.

Legacy
Korsakov in due time contributed a significant number of Russian nationalist works. He also prepared, from time to time, compositions by The Five for presentation. This brought their works straightaway into the active classical repertoire as well. He also shaped an entire generation of younger composers during his time as a music educator. Therefore, music historians consider Korsakov as the foremost engineer of what the public considers to be the Russian style of composition. He served, all in all, as a transitional figure between The Five and the classically trained composers who became the norm over time. In addition to the Russians, he forthwith influenced non-Russian composers such as Ravel, Debussy, Dukas, and Respighi.
  • Comments

For Bass Clarinet & Piano

Title by uploader: Korsakov: Flight of the Bumblebee for Bass Clarinet and Piano

Read license
19.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.11 Mb ID: SM-000508583 Upload date: 25 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Bass Clarinet
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Difficult
Duration
1'15
Year of composition
1900
Genre
Classical/Piece
Flight of the Bumblebee from Korsakov's "Tale of Tsar Saltan" Score: 9 pages, Solo part: 3 pages, Piano accompaniment part: 3 pages. Duration: ca. 1:15 Amaze your listeners with this short but stunning recital encore!

Flight of the Bumblebee is, to be sure, an orchestral interlude composed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for his opera The Tale of Tsar Saltan. Korsakov, of course, intended to musically portray the chaotic flying pattern of a bumblebee. Nowadays, this piece is one of the comparatively more famous classical works because it frequently appears from time to time in popular culture. In the opera, the piece appears notably at the close of Act III, Tableau 1. This is when the magic Swan-Bird, in fact, changes the Prince (the son of the Tsar) into a bee so he can fly away to visit his father. Interestingly, at this point in the drama, his father, in effect, does not know that he is alive.


Korsakov Background
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844 –1908) was a uniquely famous composer from Russia. He was likewise a member of an infamous assembly of composers called The Five. Korsakov was furthermore an expert in orchestration. His correspondingly most famous orchestral compositions—Capriccio Espagnol, the Russian Easter Festival Overture, and the Scheherazade suite—are important monuments of the standard music repertoire. Also, comparatively very important are his suites and excerpts from his 15 operas. Korsakov was moreover fond of using Russian folklore and fairy tales in his music, such as Scheherazade.

Nationalistic Style
Korsakov believed, similarly to fellow outspoken composer Balakirev, in creating a nationalistic, Russia-centric style of classical music. The new style was in fact called “Orientalism.” It similarly relied on native Russian materials, exotic scales, and experimental harmonic, melodic and rhythmic procedures. This practice, conversely, ran counter to the developments in Western musical culture.

Musical Developments
Nevertheless, Korsakov developed an appreciation of Western musical techniques after he became a professor of musical composition, harmony, and orchestration at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1871. Moreover, he undertook a rigorous three-year program of self-education and mastered Western methods, incorporating them in conjunction with the influences of Mikhail Glinka and other members of The Five. His techniques of composition and orchestration were additionally enriched by his exposure to the works of Richard Wagner.

Naval Service
Korsakov combined his music career accordingly with a career in the Russian military. He was in the first place an officer in the Russian Navy. In due time, he was appointed as a civilian Inspector of Naval Bands. As a result, Korsakov expanded his knowledge of woodwind and brass playing, which in turn heightened his capabilities in orchestration.

Legacy
Korsakov in due time contributed a significant number of Russian nationalist works. He also prepared, from time to time, compositions by The Five for presentation. This brought their works straightaway into the active classical repertoire as well. He also shaped an entire generation of younger composers during his time as a music educator. Therefore, music historians consider Korsakov as the foremost engineer of what the public considers to be the Russian style of composition. He served, all in all, as a transitional figure between The Five and the classically trained composers who became the norm over time. In addition to the Russians, he forthwith influenced non-Russian composers such as Ravel, Debussy, Dukas, and Respighi.
  • Comments

For Baritone Horn & Piano

Title by uploader: Korsakov: Flight of the Bumblebee for Baritone Horn and Piano

Read license
19.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.10 Mb ID: SM-000508584 Upload date: 25 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Baritone horn
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Difficult
Duration
1'15
Year of composition
1900
Genre
Classical/Piece
Flight of the Bumblebee from Korsakov's "Tale of Tsar Saltan" Score: 9 pages, Solo part: 3 pages, Piano accompaniment part: 3 pages. Duration: ca. 1:15 Amaze your listeners with this short but stunning recital encore!

Flight of the Bumblebee is, to be sure, an orchestral interlude composed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for his opera The Tale of Tsar Saltan. Korsakov, of course, intended to musically portray the chaotic flying pattern of a bumblebee. Nowadays, this piece is one of the comparatively more famous classical works because it frequently appears from time to time in popular culture. In the opera, the piece appears notably at the close of Act III, Tableau 1. This is when the magic Swan-Bird, in fact, changes the Prince (the son of the Tsar) into a bee so he can fly away to visit his father. Interestingly, at this point in the drama, his father, in effect, does not know that he is alive.


Korsakov Background
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844 –1908) was a uniquely famous composer from Russia. He was likewise a member of an infamous assembly of composers called The Five. Korsakov was furthermore an expert in orchestration. His correspondingly most famous orchestral compositions—Capriccio Espagnol, the Russian Easter Festival Overture, and the Scheherazade suite—are important monuments of the standard music repertoire. Also, comparatively very important are his suites and excerpts from his 15 operas. Korsakov was moreover fond of using Russian folklore and fairy tales in his music, such as Scheherazade.

Nationalistic Style
Korsakov believed, similarly to fellow outspoken composer Balakirev, in creating a nationalistic, Russia-centric style of classical music. The new style was in fact called “Orientalism.” It similarly relied on native Russian materials, exotic scales, and experimental harmonic, melodic and rhythmic procedures. This practice, conversely, ran counter to the developments in Western musical culture.

Musical Developments
Nevertheless, Korsakov developed an appreciation of Western musical techniques after he became a professor of musical composition, harmony, and orchestration at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1871. Moreover, he undertook a rigorous three-year program of self-education and mastered Western methods, incorporating them in conjunction with the influences of Mikhail Glinka and other members of The Five. His techniques of composition and orchestration were additionally enriched by his exposure to the works of Richard Wagner.

Naval Service
Korsakov combined his music career accordingly with a career in the Russian military. He was in the first place an officer in the Russian Navy. In due time, he was appointed as a civilian Inspector of Naval Bands. As a result, Korsakov expanded his knowledge of woodwind and brass playing, which in turn heightened his capabilities in orchestration.

Legacy
Korsakov in due time contributed a significant number of Russian nationalist works. He also prepared, from time to time, compositions by The Five for presentation. This brought their works straightaway into the active classical repertoire as well. He also shaped an entire generation of younger composers during his time as a music educator. Therefore, music historians consider Korsakov as the foremost engineer of what the public considers to be the Russian style of composition. He served, all in all, as a transitional figure between The Five and the classically trained composers who became the norm over time. In addition to the Russians, he forthwith influenced non-Russian composers such as Ravel, Debussy, Dukas, and Respighi.
  • Comments

For Bassoon & Piano

Title by uploader: Korsakov: Flight of the Bumblebee for Bassoon and Piano

Read license
19.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.08 Mb ID: SM-000508585 Upload date: 25 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Bassoon
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Advanced
Duration
1'15
Year of composition
1900
Genre
Classical/Piece
Flight of the Bumblebee from Korsakov's "Tale of Tsar Saltan" Score: 9 pages, Solo part: 3 pages, Piano accompaniment part: 3 pages. Duration: ca. 1:15 Amaze your listeners with this short but stunning recital encore!

Flight of the Bumblebee is, to be sure, an orchestral interlude composed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for his opera The Tale of Tsar Saltan. Korsakov, of course, intended to musically portray the chaotic flying pattern of a bumblebee. Nowadays, this piece is one of the comparatively more famous classical works because it frequently appears from time to time in popular culture. In the opera, the piece appears notably at the close of Act III, Tableau 1. This is when the magic Swan-Bird, in fact, changes the Prince (the son of the Tsar) into a bee so he can fly away to visit his father. Interestingly, at this point in the drama, his father, in effect, does not know that he is alive.


Korsakov Background
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844 –1908) was a uniquely famous composer from Russia. He was likewise a member of an infamous assembly of composers called The Five. Korsakov was furthermore an expert in orchestration. His correspondingly most famous orchestral compositions—Capriccio Espagnol, the Russian Easter Festival Overture, and the Scheherazade suite—are important monuments of the standard music repertoire. Also, comparatively very important are his suites and excerpts from his 15 operas. Korsakov was moreover fond of using Russian folklore and fairy tales in his music, such as Scheherazade.

Nationalistic Style
Korsakov believed, similarly to fellow outspoken composer Balakirev, in creating a nationalistic, Russia-centric style of classical music. The new style was in fact called “Orientalism.” It similarly relied on native Russian materials, exotic scales, and experimental harmonic, melodic and rhythmic procedures. This practice, conversely, ran counter to the developments in Western musical culture.

Musical Developments
Nevertheless, Korsakov developed an appreciation of Western musical techniques after he became a professor of musical composition, harmony, and orchestration at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1871. Moreover, he undertook a rigorous three-year program of self-education and mastered Western methods, incorporating them in conjunction with the influences of Mikhail Glinka and other members of The Five. His techniques of composition and orchestration were additionally enriched by his exposure to the works of Richard Wagner.

Naval Service
Korsakov combined his music career accordingly with a career in the Russian military. He was in the first place an officer in the Russian Navy. In due time, he was appointed as a civilian Inspector of Naval Bands. As a result, Korsakov expanded his knowledge of woodwind and brass playing, which in turn heightened his capabilities in orchestration.

Legacy
Korsakov in due time contributed a significant number of Russian nationalist works. He also prepared, from time to time, compositions by The Five for presentation. This brought their works straightaway into the active classical repertoire as well. He also shaped an entire generation of younger composers during his time as a music educator. Therefore, music historians consider Korsakov as the foremost engineer of what the public considers to be the Russian style of composition. He served, all in all, as a transitional figure between The Five and the classically trained composers who became the norm over time. In addition to the Russians, he forthwith influenced non-Russian composers such as Ravel, Debussy, Dukas, and Respighi.
  • Comments

For Baritone Sax & Piano

Title by uploader: Korsakov: Flight of the Bumblebee for Baritone Sax and Piano

Read license
19.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.10 Mb ID: SM-000508586 Upload date: 25 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Baritone Saxophone
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Difficult
Duration
1'15
Year of composition
1900
Genre
Classical/Piece
Flight of the Bumblebee from Korsakov's "Tale of Tsar Saltan" Score: 9 pages, Solo part: 3 pages, Piano accompaniment part: 3 pages. Duration: ca. 1:15 Amaze your listeners with this short but stunning recital encore!

Flight of the Bumblebee is, to be sure, an orchestral interlude composed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for his opera The Tale of Tsar Saltan. Korsakov, of course, intended to musically portray the chaotic flying pattern of a bumblebee. Nowadays, this piece is one of the comparatively more famous classical works because it frequently appears from time to time in popular culture. In the opera, the piece appears notably at the close of Act III, Tableau 1. This is when the magic Swan-Bird, in fact, changes the Prince (the son of the Tsar) into a bee so he can fly away to visit his father. Interestingly, at this point in the drama, his father, in effect, does not know that he is alive.


Korsakov Background
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844 –1908) was a uniquely famous composer from Russia. He was likewise a member of an infamous assembly of composers called The Five. Korsakov was furthermore an expert in orchestration. His correspondingly most famous orchestral compositions—Capriccio Espagnol, the Russian Easter Festival Overture, and the Scheherazade suite—are important monuments of the standard music repertoire. Also, comparatively very important are his suites and excerpts from his 15 operas. Korsakov was moreover fond of using Russian folklore and fairy tales in his music, such as Scheherazade.

Nationalistic Style
Korsakov believed, similarly to fellow outspoken composer Balakirev, in creating a nationalistic, Russia-centric style of classical music. The new style was in fact called “Orientalism.” It similarly relied on native Russian materials, exotic scales, and experimental harmonic, melodic and rhythmic procedures. This practice, conversely, ran counter to the developments in Western musical culture.

Musical Developments
Nevertheless, Korsakov developed an appreciation of Western musical techniques after he became a professor of musical composition, harmony, and orchestration at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1871. Moreover, he undertook a rigorous three-year program of self-education and mastered Western methods, incorporating them in conjunction with the influences of Mikhail Glinka and other members of The Five. His techniques of composition and orchestration were additionally enriched by his exposure to the works of Richard Wagner.

Naval Service
Korsakov combined his music career accordingly with a career in the Russian military. He was in the first place an officer in the Russian Navy. In due time, he was appointed as a civilian Inspector of Naval Bands. As a result, Korsakov expanded his knowledge of woodwind and brass playing, which in turn heightened his capabilities in orchestration.

Legacy
Korsakov in due time contributed a significant number of Russian nationalist works. He also prepared, from time to time, compositions by The Five for presentation. This brought their works straightaway into the active classical repertoire as well. He also shaped an entire generation of younger composers during his time as a music educator. Therefore, music historians consider Korsakov as the foremost engineer of what the public considers to be the Russian style of composition. He served, all in all, as a transitional figure between The Five and the classically trained composers who became the norm over time. In addition to the Russians, he forthwith influenced non-Russian composers such as Ravel, Debussy, Dukas, and Respighi.
  • Comments

For Clarinet & Piano

Title by uploader: Korsakov: Flight of the Bumblebee for Clarinet and Piano

Read license
19.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.10 Mb ID: SM-000508587 Upload date: 26 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Clarinet
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Advanced
Duration
1'15
Year of composition
1900
Genre
Classical/Piece
Flight of the Bumblebee from Korsakov's "Tale of Tsar Saltan" Score: 9 pages, Solo part: 3 pages, Piano accompaniment part: 3 pages. Duration: ca. 1:15 Amaze your listeners with this short but stunning recital encore!

Flight of the Bumblebee is, to be sure, an orchestral interlude composed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for his opera The Tale of Tsar Saltan. Korsakov, of course, intended to musically portray the chaotic flying pattern of a bumblebee. Nowadays, this piece is one of the comparatively more famous classical works because it frequently appears from time to time in popular culture. In the opera, the piece appears notably at the close of Act III, Tableau 1. This is when the magic Swan-Bird, in fact, changes the Prince (the son of the Tsar) into a bee so he can fly away to visit his father. Interestingly, at this point in the drama, his father, in effect, does not know that he is alive.


Korsakov Background
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844 –1908) was a uniquely famous composer from Russia. He was likewise a member of an infamous assembly of composers called The Five. Korsakov was furthermore an expert in orchestration. His correspondingly most famous orchestral compositions—Capriccio Espagnol, the Russian Easter Festival Overture, and the Scheherazade suite—are important monuments of the standard music repertoire. Also, comparatively very important are his suites and excerpts from his 15 operas. Korsakov was moreover fond of using Russian folklore and fairy tales in his music, such as Scheherazade.

Nationalistic Style
Korsakov believed, similarly to fellow outspoken composer Balakirev, in creating a nationalistic, Russia-centric style of classical music. The new style was in fact called “Orientalism.” It similarly relied on native Russian materials, exotic scales, and experimental harmonic, melodic and rhythmic procedures. This practice, conversely, ran counter to the developments in Western musical culture.

Musical Developments
Nevertheless, Korsakov developed an appreciation of Western musical techniques after he became a professor of musical composition, harmony, and orchestration at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1871. Moreover, he undertook a rigorous three-year program of self-education and mastered Western methods, incorporating them in conjunction with the influences of Mikhail Glinka and other members of The Five. His techniques of composition and orchestration were additionally enriched by his exposure to the works of Richard Wagner.

Naval Service
Korsakov combined his music career accordingly with a career in the Russian military. He was in the first place an officer in the Russian Navy. In due time, he was appointed as a civilian Inspector of Naval Bands. As a result, Korsakov expanded his knowledge of woodwind and brass playing, which in turn heightened his capabilities in orchestration.

Legacy
Korsakov in due time contributed a significant number of Russian nationalist works. He also prepared, from time to time, compositions by The Five for presentation. This brought their works straightaway into the active classical repertoire as well. He also shaped an entire generation of younger composers during his time as a music educator. Therefore, music historians consider Korsakov as the foremost engineer of what the public considers to be the Russian style of composition. He served, all in all, as a transitional figure between The Five and the classically trained composers who became the norm over time. In addition to the Russians, he forthwith influenced non-Russian composers such as Ravel, Debussy, Dukas, and Respighi.
  • Comments

For E-Flat Clarinet & Piano

Title by uploader: Korsakov: Flight of the Bumblebee for E-Flat Clarinet and Piano

Read license
19.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.10 Mb ID: SM-000508588 Upload date: 26 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Clarinet
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Difficult
Duration
1'15
Year of composition
1900
Genre
Classical/Piece
Flight of the Bumblebee from Korsakov's "Tale of Tsar Saltan" Score: 9 pages, Solo part: 3 pages, Piano accompaniment part: 3 pages. Duration: ca. 1:15 Amaze your listeners with this short but stunning recital encore!

Flight of the Bumblebee is, to be sure, an orchestral interlude composed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for his opera The Tale of Tsar Saltan. Korsakov, of course, intended to musically portray the chaotic flying pattern of a bumblebee. Nowadays, this piece is one of the comparatively more famous classical works because it frequently appears from time to time in popular culture. In the opera, the piece appears notably at the close of Act III, Tableau 1. This is when the magic Swan-Bird, in fact, changes the Prince (the son of the Tsar) into a bee so he can fly away to visit his father. Interestingly, at this point in the drama, his father, in effect, does not know that he is alive.


Korsakov Background
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844 –1908) was a uniquely famous composer from Russia. He was likewise a member of an infamous assembly of composers called The Five. Korsakov was furthermore an expert in orchestration. His correspondingly most famous orchestral compositions—Capriccio Espagnol, the Russian Easter Festival Overture, and the Scheherazade suite—are important monuments of the standard music repertoire. Also, comparatively very important are his suites and excerpts from his 15 operas. Korsakov was moreover fond of using Russian folklore and fairy tales in his music, such as Scheherazade.

Nationalistic Style
Korsakov believed, similarly to fellow outspoken composer Balakirev, in creating a nationalistic, Russia-centric style of classical music. The new style was in fact called “Orientalism.” It similarly relied on native Russian materials, exotic scales, and experimental harmonic, melodic and rhythmic procedures. This practice, conversely, ran counter to the developments in Western musical culture.

Musical Developments
Nevertheless, Korsakov developed an appreciation of Western musical techniques after he became a professor of musical composition, harmony, and orchestration at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1871. Moreover, he undertook a rigorous three-year program of self-education and mastered Western methods, incorporating them in conjunction with the influences of Mikhail Glinka and other members of The Five. His techniques of composition and orchestration were additionally enriched by his exposure to the works of Richard Wagner.

Naval Service
Korsakov combined his music career accordingly with a career in the Russian military. He was in the first place an officer in the Russian Navy. In due time, he was appointed as a civilian Inspector of Naval Bands. As a result, Korsakov expanded his knowledge of woodwind and brass playing, which in turn heightened his capabilities in orchestration.

Legacy
Korsakov in due time contributed a significant number of Russian nationalist works. He also prepared, from time to time, compositions by The Five for presentation. This brought their works straightaway into the active classical repertoire as well. He also shaped an entire generation of younger composers during his time as a music educator. Therefore, music historians consider Korsakov as the foremost engineer of what the public considers to be the Russian style of composition. He served, all in all, as a transitional figure between The Five and the classically trained composers who became the norm over time. In addition to the Russians, he forthwith influenced non-Russian composers such as Ravel, Debussy, Dukas, and Respighi.
  • Comments

For Euphonium & Piano

Title by uploader: Korsakov: Flight of the Bumblebee for Euphonium and Piano
Flight of the Bumblebee: For Euphonium & Piano by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov

Read license
19.95 USD

Will be available soon
Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.09 Mb ID: SM-000508589 Upload date: 26 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Euphonium
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Advanced
Duration
1'15
Year of composition
1900
Genre
Classical/Piece
Flight of the Bumblebee from Korsakov's "Tale of Tsar Saltan" Score: 9 pages, Solo part: 3 pages, Piano accompaniment part: 3 pages. Duration: ca. 1:15 Amaze your listeners with this short but stunning recital encore!

Flight of the Bumblebee is, to be sure, an orchestral interlude composed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for his opera The Tale of Tsar Saltan. Korsakov, of course, intended to musically portray the chaotic flying pattern of a bumblebee. Nowadays, this piece is one of the comparatively more famous classical works because it frequently appears from time to time in popular culture. In the opera, the piece appears notably at the close of Act III, Tableau 1. This is when the magic Swan-Bird, in fact, changes the Prince (the son of the Tsar) into a bee so he can fly away to visit his father. Interestingly, at this point in the drama, his father, in effect, does not know that he is alive.


Korsakov Background
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844 –1908) was a uniquely famous composer from Russia. He was likewise a member of an infamous assembly of composers called The Five. Korsakov was furthermore an expert in orchestration. His correspondingly most famous orchestral compositions—Capriccio Espagnol, the Russian Easter Festival Overture, and the Scheherazade suite—are important monuments of the standard music repertoire. Also, comparatively very important are his suites and excerpts from his 15 operas. Korsakov was moreover fond of using Russian folklore and fairy tales in his music, such as Scheherazade.

Nationalistic Style
Korsakov believed, similarly to fellow outspoken composer Balakirev, in creating a nationalistic, Russia-centric style of classical music. The new style was in fact called “Orientalism.” It similarly relied on native Russian materials, exotic scales, and experimental harmonic, melodic and rhythmic procedures. This practice, conversely, ran counter to the developments in Western musical culture.

Musical Developments
Nevertheless, Korsakov developed an appreciation of Western musical techniques after he became a professor of musical composition, harmony, and orchestration at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1871. Moreover, he undertook a rigorous three-year program of self-education and mastered Western methods, incorporating them in conjunction with the influences of Mikhail Glinka and other members of The Five. His techniques of composition and orchestration were additionally enriched by his exposure to the works of Richard Wagner.

Naval Service
Korsakov combined his music career accordingly with a career in the Russian military. He was in the first place an officer in the Russian Navy. In due time, he was appointed as a civilian Inspector of Naval Bands. As a result, Korsakov expanded his knowledge of woodwind and brass playing, which in turn heightened his capabilities in orchestration.

Legacy
Korsakov in due time contributed a significant number of Russian nationalist works. He also prepared, from time to time, compositions by The Five for presentation. This brought their works straightaway into the active classical repertoire as well. He also shaped an entire generation of younger composers during his time as a music educator. Therefore, music historians consider Korsakov as the foremost engineer of what the public considers to be the Russian style of composition. He served, all in all, as a transitional figure between The Five and the classically trained composers who became the norm over time. In addition to the Russians, he forthwith influenced non-Russian composers such as Ravel, Debussy, Dukas, and Respighi.
  • Comments

For Flute & Piano

Title by uploader: Korsakov: Flight of the Bumblebee for Flute and Piano

Read license
19.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.11 Mb ID: SM-000508590 Upload date: 26 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Flute
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Difficult
Duration
1'15
Year of composition
1900
Genre
Classical/Piece
Flight of the Bumblebee from Korsakov's "Tale of Tsar Saltan" Score: 9 pages, Solo part: 3 pages, Piano accompaniment part: 3 pages. Duration: ca. 1:15 Amaze your listeners with this short but stunning recital encore!

Flight of the Bumblebee is, to be sure, an orchestral interlude composed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for his opera The Tale of Tsar Saltan. Korsakov, of course, intended to musically portray the chaotic flying pattern of a bumblebee. Nowadays, this piece is one of the comparatively more famous classical works because it frequently appears from time to time in popular culture. In the opera, the piece appears notably at the close of Act III, Tableau 1. This is when the magic Swan-Bird, in fact, changes the Prince (the son of the Tsar) into a bee so he can fly away to visit his father. Interestingly, at this point in the drama, his father, in effect, does not know that he is alive.


Korsakov Background
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844 –1908) was a uniquely famous composer from Russia. He was likewise a member of an infamous assembly of composers called The Five. Korsakov was furthermore an expert in orchestration. His correspondingly most famous orchestral compositions—Capriccio Espagnol, the Russian Easter Festival Overture, and the Scheherazade suite—are important monuments of the standard music repertoire. Also, comparatively very important are his suites and excerpts from his 15 operas. Korsakov was moreover fond of using Russian folklore and fairy tales in his music, such as Scheherazade.

Nationalistic Style
Korsakov believed, similarly to fellow outspoken composer Balakirev, in creating a nationalistic, Russia-centric style of classical music. The new style was in fact called “Orientalism.” It similarly relied on native Russian materials, exotic scales, and experimental harmonic, melodic and rhythmic procedures. This practice, conversely, ran counter to the developments in Western musical culture.

Musical Developments
Nevertheless, Korsakov developed an appreciation of Western musical techniques after he became a professor of musical composition, harmony, and orchestration at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1871. Moreover, he undertook a rigorous three-year program of self-education and mastered Western methods, incorporating them in conjunction with the influences of Mikhail Glinka and other members of The Five. His techniques of composition and orchestration were additionally enriched by his exposure to the works of Richard Wagner.

Naval Service
Korsakov combined his music career accordingly with a career in the Russian military. He was in the first place an officer in the Russian Navy. In due time, he was appointed as a civilian Inspector of Naval Bands. As a result, Korsakov expanded his knowledge of woodwind and brass playing, which in turn heightened his capabilities in orchestration.

Legacy
Korsakov in due time contributed a significant number of Russian nationalist works. He also prepared, from time to time, compositions by The Five for presentation. This brought their works straightaway into the active classical repertoire as well. He also shaped an entire generation of younger composers during his time as a music educator. Therefore, music historians consider Korsakov as the foremost engineer of what the public considers to be the Russian style of composition. He served, all in all, as a transitional figure between The Five and the classically trained composers who became the norm over time. In addition to the Russians, he forthwith influenced non-Russian composers such as Ravel, Debussy, Dukas, and Respighi.
  • Comments

For French Horn & Piano

Title by uploader: Korsakov: Flight of the Bumblebee for French Horn and Piano

Read license
19.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.13 Mb ID: SM-000508591 Upload date: 26 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Horn
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Advanced
Duration
1'15
Year of composition
1900
Genre
Classical/Piece
Jmsgu3 Publications S0.333061

DESCRIPTION
Flight of the Bumblebee from Korsakov's "Tale of Tsar Saltan" Score: 9 pages, Solo part: 3 pages, Piano accompaniment part: 3 pages. Duration: ca. 1:15 Amaze your listeners with this short but stunning recital encore!

Flight of the Bumblebee is, to be sure, an orchestral interlude composed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for his opera The Tale of Tsar Saltan. Korsakov, of course, intended to musically portray the chaotic flying pattern of a bumblebee. Nowadays, this piece is one of the comparatively more famous classical works because it frequently appears from time to time in popular culture. In the opera, the piece appears notably at the close of Act III, Tableau 1. This is when the magic Swan-Bird, in fact, changes the Prince (the son of the Tsar) into a bee so he can fly away to visit his father. Interestingly, at this point in the drama, his father, in effect, does not know that he is alive.


Korsakov Background
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844 –1908) was a uniquely famous composer from Russia. He was likewise a member of an infamous assembly of composers called The Five. Korsakov was furthermore an expert in orchestration. His correspondingly most famous orchestral compositions—Capriccio Espagnol, the Russian Easter Festival Overture, and the Scheherazade suite—are important monuments of the standard music repertoire. Also, comparatively very important are his suites and excerpts from his 15 operas. Korsakov was moreover fond of using Russian folklore and fairy tales in his music, such as Scheherazade.

Nationalistic Style
Korsakov believed, similarly to fellow outspoken composer Balakirev, in creating a nationalistic, Russia-centric style of classical music. The new style was in fact called “Orientalism.” It similarly relied on native Russian materials, exotic scales, and experimental harmonic, melodic and rhythmic procedures. This practice, conversely, ran counter to the developments in Western musical culture.

Musical Developments
Nevertheless, Korsakov developed an appreciation of Western musical techniques after he became a professor of musical composition, harmony, and orchestration at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1871. Moreover, he undertook a rigorous three-year program of self-education and mastered Western methods, incorporating them in conjunction with the influences of Mikhail Glinka and other members of The Five. His techniques of composition and orchestration were additionally enriched by his exposure to the works of Richard Wagner.

Naval Service
Korsakov combined his music career accordingly with a career in the Russian military. He was in the first place an officer in the Russian Navy. In due time, he was appointed as a civilian Inspector of Naval Bands. As a result, Korsakov expanded his knowledge of woodwind and brass playing, which in turn heightened his capabilities in orchestration.

Legacy
Korsakov in due time contributed a significant number of Russian nationalist works. He also prepared, from time to time, compositions by The Five for presentation. This brought their works straightaway into the active classical repertoire as well. He also shaped an entire generation of younger composers during his time as a music educator. Therefore, music historians consider Korsakov as the foremost engineer of what the public considers to be the Russian style of composition. He served, all in all, as a transitional figure between The Five and the classically trained composers who became the norm over time. In addition to the Russians, he forthwith influenced non-Russian composers such as Ravel, Debussy, Dukas, and Respighi.
  • Comments

For Oboe & Piano

Title by uploader: Korsakov: Flight of the Bumblebee for Oboe and Piano

Read license
19.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.09 Mb ID: SM-000508592 Upload date: 26 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Oboe
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Difficult
Duration
1'15
Genre
Classical/Piece
msgu3 Publications S0.333055

DESCRIPTION
Flight of the Bumblebee from Korsakov's "Tale of Tsar Saltan" Score: 9 pages, Solo part: 3 pages, Piano accompaniment part: 3 pages. Duration: ca. 1:15 Amaze your listeners with this short but stunning recital encore!

Flight of the Bumblebee is, to be sure, an orchestral interlude composed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for his opera The Tale of Tsar Saltan. Korsakov, of course, intended to musically portray the chaotic flying pattern of a bumblebee. Nowadays, this piece is one of the comparatively more famous classical works because it frequently appears from time to time in popular culture. In the opera, the piece appears notably at the close of Act III, Tableau 1. This is when the magic Swan-Bird, in fact, changes the Prince (the son of the Tsar) into a bee so he can fly away to visit his father. Interestingly, at this point in the drama, his father, in effect, does not know that he is alive.


Korsakov Background
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844 –1908) was a uniquely famous composer from Russia. He was likewise a member of an infamous assembly of composers called The Five. Korsakov was furthermore an expert in orchestration. His correspondingly most famous orchestral compositions—Capriccio Espagnol, the Russian Easter Festival Overture, and the Scheherazade suite—are important monuments of the standard music repertoire. Also, comparatively very important are his suites and excerpts from his 15 operas. Korsakov was moreover fond of using Russian folklore and fairy tales in his music, such as Scheherazade.

Nationalistic Style
Korsakov believed, similarly to fellow outspoken composer Balakirev, in creating a nationalistic, Russia-centric style of classical music. The new style was in fact called “Orientalism.” It similarly relied on native Russian materials, exotic scales, and experimental harmonic, melodic and rhythmic procedures. This practice, conversely, ran counter to the developments in Western musical culture.

Musical Developments
Nevertheless, Korsakov developed an appreciation of Western musical techniques after he became a professor of musical composition, harmony, and orchestration at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1871. Moreover, he undertook a rigorous three-year program of self-education and mastered Western methods, incorporating them in conjunction with the influences of Mikhail Glinka and other members of The Five. His techniques of composition and orchestration were additionally enriched by his exposure to the works of Richard Wagner.

Naval Service
Korsakov combined his music career accordingly with a career in the Russian military. He was in the first place an officer in the Russian Navy. In due time, he was appointed as a civilian Inspector of Naval Bands. As a result, Korsakov expanded his knowledge of woodwind and brass playing, which in turn heightened his capabilities in orchestration.

Legacy
Korsakov in due time contributed a significant number of Russian nationalist works. He also prepared, from time to time, compositions by The Five for presentation. This brought their works straightaway into the active classical repertoire as well. He also shaped an entire generation of younger composers during his time as a music educator. Therefore, music historians consider Korsakov as the foremost engineer of what the public considers to be the Russian style of composition. He served, all in all, as a transitional figure between The Five and the classically trained composers who became the norm over time. In addition to the Russians, he forthwith influenced non-Russian composers such as Ravel, Debussy, Dukas, and Respighi.
  • Comments

For Piccolo & Piano

Title by uploader: Korsakov: Flight of the Bumblebee for Piccolo and Piano

Read license
19.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.09 Mb ID: SM-000508593 Upload date: 26 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Flute piccolo
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Advanced
Duration
1'15
Year of composition
1900
Genre
Classical/Piece
Jmsgu3 Publications S0.333053

DESCRIPTION
Flight of the Bumblebee from Korsakov's "Tale of Tsar Saltan" Score: 9 pages, Solo part: 3 pages, Piano accompaniment part: 3 pages. Duration: ca. 1:15 Amaze your listeners with this short but stunning recital encore!

Flight of the Bumblebee is, to be sure, an orchestral interlude composed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for his opera The Tale of Tsar Saltan. Korsakov, of course, intended to musically portray the chaotic flying pattern of a bumblebee. Nowadays, this piece is one of the comparatively more famous classical works because it frequently appears from time to time in popular culture. In the opera, the piece appears notably at the close of Act III, Tableau 1. This is when the magic Swan-Bird, in fact, changes the Prince (the son of the Tsar) into a bee so he can fly away to visit his father. Interestingly, at this point in the drama, his father, in effect, does not know that he is alive.


Korsakov Background
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844 –1908) was a uniquely famous composer from Russia. He was likewise a member of an infamous assembly of composers called The Five. Korsakov was furthermore an expert in orchestration. His correspondingly most famous orchestral compositions—Capriccio Espagnol, the Russian Easter Festival Overture, and the Scheherazade suite—are important monuments of the standard music repertoire. Also, comparatively very important are his suites and excerpts from his 15 operas. Korsakov was moreover fond of using Russian folklore and fairy tales in his music, such as Scheherazade.

Nationalistic Style
Korsakov believed, similarly to fellow outspoken composer Balakirev, in creating a nationalistic, Russia-centric style of classical music. The new style was in fact called “Orientalism.” It similarly relied on native Russian materials, exotic scales, and experimental harmonic, melodic and rhythmic procedures. This practice, conversely, ran counter to the developments in Western musical culture.

Musical Developments
Nevertheless, Korsakov developed an appreciation of Western musical techniques after he became a professor of musical composition, harmony, and orchestration at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1871. Moreover, he undertook a rigorous three-year program of self-education and mastered Western methods, incorporating them in conjunction with the influences of Mikhail Glinka and other members of The Five. His techniques of composition and orchestration were additionally enriched by his exposure to the works of Richard Wagner.

Naval Service
Korsakov combined his music career accordingly with a career in the Russian military. He was in the first place an officer in the Russian Navy. In due time, he was appointed as a civilian Inspector of Naval Bands. As a result, Korsakov expanded his knowledge of woodwind and brass playing, which in turn heightened his capabilities in orchestration.

Legacy
Korsakov in due time contributed a significant number of Russian nationalist works. He also prepared, from time to time, compositions by The Five for presentation. This brought their works straightaway into the active classical repertoire as well. He also shaped an entire generation of younger composers during his time as a music educator. Therefore, music historians consider Korsakov as the foremost engineer of what the public considers to be the Russian style of composition. He served, all in all, as a transitional figure between The Five and the classically trained composers who became the norm over time. In addition to the Russians, he forthwith influenced non-Russian composers such as Ravel, Debussy, Dukas, and Respighi.
  • Comments

For Soprano Sax & Piano

Title by uploader: Korsakov: Flight of the Bumblebee for Soprano Sax and Piano

Read license
19.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.20 Mb ID: SM-000508594 Upload date: 26 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Soprano Saxophone
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Advanced
Duration
1'15
Year of composition
1900
Genre
Classical/Piece
Jmsgu3 Publications S0.333147

DESCRIPTION
Flight of the Bumblebee from Korsakov's "Tale of Tsar Saltan" Score: 9 pages, Solo part: 3 pages, Piano accompaniment part: 3 pages. Duration: ca. 1:15 Amaze your listeners with this short but stunning recital encore!

Flight of the Bumblebee is, to be sure, an orchestral interlude composed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for his opera The Tale of Tsar Saltan. Korsakov, of course, intended to musically portray the chaotic flying pattern of a bumblebee. Nowadays, this piece is one of the comparatively more famous classical works because it frequently appears from time to time in popular culture. In the opera, the piece appears notably at the close of Act III, Tableau 1. This is when the magic Swan-Bird, in fact, changes the Prince (the son of the Tsar) into a bee so he can fly away to visit his father. Interestingly, at this point in the drama, his father, in effect, does not know that he is alive.


Korsakov Background
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844 –1908) was a uniquely famous composer from Russia. He was likewise a member of an infamous assembly of composers called The Five. Korsakov was furthermore an expert in orchestration. His correspondingly most famous orchestral compositions—Capriccio Espagnol, the Russian Easter Festival Overture, and the Scheherazade suite—are important monuments of the standard music repertoire. Also, comparatively very important are his suites and excerpts from his 15 operas. Korsakov was moreover fond of using Russian folklore and fairy tales in his music, such as Scheherazade.

Nationalistic Style
Korsakov believed, similarly to fellow outspoken composer Balakirev, in creating a nationalistic, Russia-centric style of classical music. The new style was in fact called “Orientalism.” It similarly relied on native Russian materials, exotic scales, and experimental harmonic, melodic and rhythmic procedures. This practice, conversely, ran counter to the developments in Western musical culture.

Musical Developments
Nevertheless, Korsakov developed an appreciation of Western musical techniques after he became a professor of musical composition, harmony, and orchestration at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1871. Moreover, he undertook a rigorous three-year program of self-education and mastered Western methods, incorporating them in conjunction with the influences of Mikhail Glinka and other members of The Five. His techniques of composition and orchestration were additionally enriched by his exposure to the works of Richard Wagner.

Naval Service
Korsakov combined his music career accordingly with a career in the Russian military. He was in the first place an officer in the Russian Navy. In due time, he was appointed as a civilian Inspector of Naval Bands. As a result, Korsakov expanded his knowledge of woodwind and brass playing, which in turn heightened his capabilities in orchestration.

Legacy
Korsakov in due time contributed a significant number of Russian nationalist works. He also prepared, from time to time, compositions by The Five for presentation. This brought their works straightaway into the active classical repertoire as well. He also shaped an entire generation of younger composers during his time as a music educator. Therefore, music historians consider Korsakov as the foremost engineer of what the public considers to be the Russian style of composition. He served, all in all, as a transitional figure between The Five and the classically trained composers who became the norm over time. In addition to the Russians, he forthwith influenced non-Russian composers such as Ravel, Debussy, Dukas, and Respighi.
  • Comments

For Tuba & Piano

Title by uploader: Korsakov: Flight of the Bumblebee for Tuba and Piano

Read license
19.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.13 Mb ID: SM-000508595 Upload date: 26 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Tuba
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Difficult
Duration
1'15
Year of composition
1900
Genre
Classical/Piece
Jmsgu3 Publications S0.333043

DESCRIPTION
Flight of the Bumblebee from Korsakov's "Tale of Tsar Saltan" Score: 9 pages, Solo part: 3 pages, Piano accompaniment part: 3 pages. Duration: ca. 1:15 Amaze your listeners with this short but stunning recital encore!

Flight of the Bumblebee is, to be sure, an orchestral interlude composed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for his opera The Tale of Tsar Saltan. Korsakov, of course, intended to musically portray the chaotic flying pattern of a bumblebee. Nowadays, this piece is one of the comparatively more famous classical works because it frequently appears from time to time in popular culture. In the opera, the piece appears notably at the close of Act III, Tableau 1. This is when the magic Swan-Bird, in fact, changes the Prince (the son of the Tsar) into a bee so he can fly away to visit his father. Interestingly, at this point in the drama, his father, in effect, does not know that he is alive.


Korsakov Background
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844 –1908) was a uniquely famous composer from Russia. He was likewise a member of an infamous assembly of composers called The Five. Korsakov was furthermore an expert in orchestration. His correspondingly most famous orchestral compositions—Capriccio Espagnol, the Russian Easter Festival Overture, and the Scheherazade suite—are important monuments of the standard music repertoire. Also, comparatively very important are his suites and excerpts from his 15 operas. Korsakov was moreover fond of using Russian folklore and fairy tales in his music, such as Scheherazade.

Nationalistic Style
Korsakov believed, similarly to fellow outspoken composer Balakirev, in creating a nationalistic, Russia-centric style of classical music. The new style was in fact called “Orientalism.” It similarly relied on native Russian materials, exotic scales, and experimental harmonic, melodic and rhythmic procedures. This practice, conversely, ran counter to the developments in Western musical culture.

Musical Developments
Nevertheless, Korsakov developed an appreciation of Western musical techniques after he became a professor of musical composition, harmony, and orchestration at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1871. Moreover, he undertook a rigorous three-year program of self-education and mastered Western methods, incorporating them in conjunction with the influences of Mikhail Glinka and other members of The Five. His techniques of composition and orchestration were additionally enriched by his exposure to the works of Richard Wagner.

Naval Service
Korsakov combined his music career accordingly with a career in the Russian military. He was in the first place an officer in the Russian Navy. In due time, he was appointed as a civilian Inspector of Naval Bands. As a result, Korsakov expanded his knowledge of woodwind and brass playing, which in turn heightened his capabilities in orchestration.

Legacy
Korsakov in due time contributed a significant number of Russian nationalist works. He also prepared, from time to time, compositions by The Five for presentation. This brought their works straightaway into the active classical repertoire as well. He also shaped an entire generation of younger composers during his time as a music educator. Therefore, music historians consider Korsakov as the foremost engineer of what the public considers to be the Russian style of composition. He served, all in all, as a transitional figure between The Five and the classically trained composers who became the norm over time. In addition to the Russians, he forthwith influenced non-Russian composers such as Ravel, Debussy, Dukas, and Respighi.
  • Comments

For Trumpet & Piano

Title by uploader: Korsakov: Flight of the Bumblebee for Trumpet and Piano

Read license
19.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.09 Mb ID: SM-000508596 Upload date: 26 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Trumpet
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Difficult
Duration
1'15
Year of composition
1900
Genre
Classical/Piece
Flight of the Bumblebee from Korsakov's "Tale of Tsar Saltan" Score: 9 pages, Solo part: 3 pages, Piano accompaniment part: 3 pages. Duration: ca. 1:15 Amaze your listeners with this short but stunning recital encore!

Flight of the Bumblebee is, to be sure, an orchestral interlude composed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for his opera The Tale of Tsar Saltan. Korsakov, of course, intended to musically portray the chaotic flying pattern of a bumblebee. Nowadays, this piece is one of the comparatively more famous classical works because it frequently appears from time to time in popular culture. In the opera, the piece appears notably at the close of Act III, Tableau 1. This is when the magic Swan-Bird, in fact, changes the Prince (the son of the Tsar) into a bee so he can fly away to visit his father. Interestingly, at this point in the drama, his father, in effect, does not know that he is alive.


Korsakov Background
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844 –1908) was a uniquely famous composer from Russia. He was likewise a member of an infamous assembly of composers called The Five. Korsakov was furthermore an expert in orchestration. His correspondingly most famous orchestral compositions—Capriccio Espagnol, the Russian Easter Festival Overture, and the Scheherazade suite—are important monuments of the standard music repertoire. Also, comparatively very important are his suites and excerpts from his 15 operas. Korsakov was moreover fond of using Russian folklore and fairy tales in his music, such as Scheherazade.

Nationalistic Style
Korsakov believed, similarly to fellow outspoken composer Balakirev, in creating a nationalistic, Russia-centric style of classical music. The new style was in fact called “Orientalism.” It similarly relied on native Russian materials, exotic scales, and experimental harmonic, melodic and rhythmic procedures. This practice, conversely, ran counter to the developments in Western musical culture.

Musical Developments
Nevertheless, Korsakov developed an appreciation of Western musical techniques after he became a professor of musical composition, harmony, and orchestration at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1871. Moreover, he undertook a rigorous three-year program of self-education and mastered Western methods, incorporating them in conjunction with the influences of Mikhail Glinka and other members of The Five. His techniques of composition and orchestration were additionally enriched by his exposure to the works of Richard Wagner.

Naval Service
Korsakov combined his music career accordingly with a career in the Russian military. He was in the first place an officer in the Russian Navy. In due time, he was appointed as a civilian Inspector of Naval Bands. As a result, Korsakov expanded his knowledge of woodwind and brass playing, which in turn heightened his capabilities in orchestration.

Legacy
Korsakov in due time contributed a significant number of Russian nationalist works. He also prepared, from time to time, compositions by The Five for presentation. This brought their works straightaway into the active classical repertoire as well. He also shaped an entire generation of younger composers during his time as a music educator. Therefore, music historians consider Korsakov as the foremost engineer of what the public considers to be the Russian style of composition. He served, all in all, as a transitional figure between The Five and the classically trained composers who became the norm over time. In addition to the Russians, he forthwith influenced non-Russian composers such as Ravel, Debussy, Dukas, and Respighi.
  • Comments

For Tenor Sax & Piano

Title by uploader: Korsakov: Flight of the Bumblebee for Tenor Sax and Piano

Read license
19.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.15 Mb ID: SM-000508597 Upload date: 26 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Tenor Saxophone
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Difficult
Duration
1'15
Year of composition
1900
Genre
Classical/Piece
Jmsgu3 Publications S0.333153

DESCRIPTION
Flight of the Bumblebee from Korsakov's "Tale of Tsar Saltan" Score: 9 pages, Solo part: 3 pages, Piano accompaniment part: 3 pages. Duration: ca. 1:15 Amaze your listeners with this short but stunning recital encore!

Flight of the Bumblebee is, to be sure, an orchestral interlude composed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for his opera The Tale of Tsar Saltan. Korsakov, of course, intended to musically portray the chaotic flying pattern of a bumblebee. Nowadays, this piece is one of the comparatively more famous classical works because it frequently appears from time to time in popular culture. In the opera, the piece appears notably at the close of Act III, Tableau 1. This is when the magic Swan-Bird, in fact, changes the Prince (the son of the Tsar) into a bee so he can fly away to visit his father. Interestingly, at this point in the drama, his father, in effect, does not know that he is alive.


Korsakov Background
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844 –1908) was a uniquely famous composer from Russia. He was likewise a member of an infamous assembly of composers called The Five. Korsakov was furthermore an expert in orchestration. His correspondingly most famous orchestral compositions—Capriccio Espagnol, the Russian Easter Festival Overture, and the Scheherazade suite—are important monuments of the standard music repertoire. Also, comparatively very important are his suites and excerpts from his 15 operas. Korsakov was moreover fond of using Russian folklore and fairy tales in his music, such as Scheherazade.

Nationalistic Style
Korsakov believed, similarly to fellow outspoken composer Balakirev, in creating a nationalistic, Russia-centric style of classical music. The new style was in fact called “Orientalism.” It similarly relied on native Russian materials, exotic scales, and experimental harmonic, melodic and rhythmic procedures. This practice, conversely, ran counter to the developments in Western musical culture.

Musical Developments
Nevertheless, Korsakov developed an appreciation of Western musical techniques after he became a professor of musical composition, harmony, and orchestration at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1871. Moreover, he undertook a rigorous three-year program of self-education and mastered Western methods, incorporating them in conjunction with the influences of Mikhail Glinka and other members of The Five. His techniques of composition and orchestration were additionally enriched by his exposure to the works of Richard Wagner.

Naval Service
Korsakov combined his music career accordingly with a career in the Russian military. He was in the first place an officer in the Russian Navy. In due time, he was appointed as a civilian Inspector of Naval Bands. As a result, Korsakov expanded his knowledge of woodwind and brass playing, which in turn heightened his capabilities in orchestration.

Legacy
Korsakov in due time contributed a significant number of Russian nationalist works. He also prepared, from time to time, compositions by The Five for presentation. This brought their works straightaway into the active classical repertoire as well. He also shaped an entire generation of younger composers during his time as a music educator. Therefore, music historians consider Korsakov as the foremost engineer of what the public considers to be the Russian style of composition. He served, all in all, as a transitional figure between The Five and the classically trained composers who became the norm over time. In addition to the Russians, he forthwith influenced non-Russian composers such as Ravel, Debussy, Dukas, and Respighi.
  • Comments

For Cello & Piano

Title by uploader: Korsakov: Flight of the Bumblebee for Cello and Piano

Read license
19.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.14 Mb ID: SM-000508598 Upload date: 26 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Cello
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Difficult
Duration
1'15
Year of composition
1900
Genre
Classical/Piece
Jmsgu3 Publications S0.333035

DESCRIPTION
Flight of the Bumblebee from Korsakov's "Tale of Tsar Saltan" Score: 9 pages, Solo part: 3 pages, Piano accompaniment part: 3 pages. Duration: ca. 1:15 Amaze your listeners with this short but stunning recital encore!

Flight of the Bumblebee is, to be sure, an orchestral interlude composed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for his opera The Tale of Tsar Saltan. Korsakov, of course, intended to musically portray the chaotic flying pattern of a bumblebee. Nowadays, this piece is one of the comparatively more famous classical works because it frequently appears from time to time in popular culture. In the opera, the piece appears notably at the close of Act III, Tableau 1. This is when the magic Swan-Bird, in fact, changes the Prince (the son of the Tsar) into a bee so he can fly away to visit his father. Interestingly, at this point in the drama, his father, in effect, does not know that he is alive.


Korsakov Background
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844 –1908) was a uniquely famous composer from Russia. He was likewise a member of an infamous assembly of composers called The Five. Korsakov was furthermore an expert in orchestration. His correspondingly most famous orchestral compositions—Capriccio Espagnol, the Russian Easter Festival Overture, and the Scheherazade suite—are important monuments of the standard music repertoire. Also, comparatively very important are his suites and excerpts from his 15 operas. Korsakov was moreover fond of using Russian folklore and fairy tales in his music, such as Scheherazade.

Nationalistic Style
Korsakov believed, similarly to fellow outspoken composer Balakirev, in creating a nationalistic, Russia-centric style of classical music. The new style was in fact called “Orientalism.” It similarly relied on native Russian materials, exotic scales, and experimental harmonic, melodic and rhythmic procedures. This practice, conversely, ran counter to the developments in Western musical culture.

Musical Developments
Nevertheless, Korsakov developed an appreciation of Western musical techniques after he became a professor of musical composition, harmony, and orchestration at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1871. Moreover, he undertook a rigorous three-year program of self-education and mastered Western methods, incorporating them in conjunction with the influences of Mikhail Glinka and other members of The Five. His techniques of composition and orchestration were additionally enriched by his exposure to the works of Richard Wagner.

Naval Service
Korsakov combined his music career accordingly with a career in the Russian military. He was in the first place an officer in the Russian Navy. In due time, he was appointed as a civilian Inspector of Naval Bands. As a result, Korsakov expanded his knowledge of woodwind and brass playing, which in turn heightened his capabilities in orchestration.

Legacy
Korsakov in due time contributed a significant number of Russian nationalist works. He also prepared, from time to time, compositions by The Five for presentation. This brought their works straightaway into the active classical repertoire as well. He also shaped an entire generation of younger composers during his time as a music educator. Therefore, music historians consider Korsakov as the foremost engineer of what the public considers to be the Russian style of composition. He served, all in all, as a transitional figure between The Five and the classically trained composers who became the norm over time. In addition to the Russians, he forthwith influenced non-Russian composers such as Ravel, Debussy, Dukas, and Respighi.
  • Comments

For Violin & Piano

Title by uploader: Korsakov: Flight of the Bumblebee for Violin and Piano

Read license
19.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.12 Mb ID: SM-000508599 Upload date: 26 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Violin
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Difficult
Duration
1'15
Year of composition
1900
Genre
Classical/Piece
Jmsgu3 Publications S0.333031

DESCRIPTION
Flight of the Bumblebee from Korsakov's "Tale of Tsar Saltan" Score: 9 pages, Solo part: 3 pages, Piano accompaniment part: 3 pages. Duration: ca. 1:15 Amaze your listeners with this short but stunning recital encore!

Flight of the Bumblebee is, to be sure, an orchestral interlude composed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for his opera The Tale of Tsar Saltan. Korsakov, of course, intended to musically portray the chaotic flying pattern of a bumblebee. Nowadays, this piece is one of the comparatively more famous classical works because it frequently appears from time to time in popular culture. In the opera, the piece appears notably at the close of Act III, Tableau 1. This is when the magic Swan-Bird, in fact, changes the Prince (the son of the Tsar) into a bee so he can fly away to visit his father. Interestingly, at this point in the drama, his father, in effect, does not know that he is alive.


Korsakov Background
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844 –1908) was a uniquely famous composer from Russia. He was likewise a member of an infamous assembly of composers called The Five. Korsakov was furthermore an expert in orchestration. His correspondingly most famous orchestral compositions—Capriccio Espagnol, the Russian Easter Festival Overture, and the Scheherazade suite—are important monuments of the standard music repertoire. Also, comparatively very important are his suites and excerpts from his 15 operas. Korsakov was moreover fond of using Russian folklore and fairy tales in his music, such as Scheherazade.

Nationalistic Style
Korsakov believed, similarly to fellow outspoken composer Balakirev, in creating a nationalistic, Russia-centric style of classical music. The new style was in fact called “Orientalism.” It similarly relied on native Russian materials, exotic scales, and experimental harmonic, melodic and rhythmic procedures. This practice, conversely, ran counter to the developments in Western musical culture.

Musical Developments
Nevertheless, Korsakov developed an appreciation of Western musical techniques after he became a professor of musical composition, harmony, and orchestration at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1871. Moreover, he undertook a rigorous three-year program of self-education and mastered Western methods, incorporating them in conjunction with the influences of Mikhail Glinka and other members of The Five. His techniques of composition and orchestration were additionally enriched by his exposure to the works of Richard Wagner.

Naval Service
Korsakov combined his music career accordingly with a career in the Russian military. He was in the first place an officer in the Russian Navy. In due time, he was appointed as a civilian Inspector of Naval Bands. As a result, Korsakov expanded his knowledge of woodwind and brass playing, which in turn heightened his capabilities in orchestration.

Legacy
Korsakov in due time contributed a significant number of Russian nationalist works. He also prepared, from time to time, compositions by The Five for presentation. This brought their works straightaway into the active classical repertoire as well. He also shaped an entire generation of younger composers during his time as a music educator. Therefore, music historians consider Korsakov as the foremost engineer of what the public considers to be the Russian style of composition. He served, all in all, as a transitional figure between The Five and the classically trained composers who became the norm over time. In addition to the Russians, he forthwith influenced non-Russian composers such as Ravel, Debussy, Dukas, and Respighi.
  • Comments

For Viola & Piano

Title by uploader: Korsakov: Flight of the Bumblebee for Viola and Piano

Read license
19.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.11 Mb ID: SM-000508600 Upload date: 26 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Viola
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Difficult
Duration
1'15
Year of composition
1900
Genre
Classical/Piece
Jmsgu3 Publications S0.333029

DESCRIPTION
Flight of the Bumblebee from Korsakov's "Tale of Tsar Saltan" Score: 9 pages, Solo part: 3 pages, Piano accompaniment part: 3 pages. Duration: ca. 1:15 Amaze your listeners with this short but stunning recital encore!

Flight of the Bumblebee is, to be sure, an orchestral interlude composed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for his opera The Tale of Tsar Saltan. Korsakov, of course, intended to musically portray the chaotic flying pattern of a bumblebee. Nowadays, this piece is one of the comparatively more famous classical works because it frequently appears from time to time in popular culture. In the opera, the piece appears notably at the close of Act III, Tableau 1. This is when the magic Swan-Bird, in fact, changes the Prince (the son of the Tsar) into a bee so he can fly away to visit his father. Interestingly, at this point in the drama, his father, in effect, does not know that he is alive.


Korsakov Background
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844 –1908) was a uniquely famous composer from Russia. He was likewise a member of an infamous assembly of composers called The Five. Korsakov was furthermore an expert in orchestration. His correspondingly most famous orchestral compositions—Capriccio Espagnol, the Russian Easter Festival Overture, and the Scheherazade suite—are important monuments of the standard music repertoire. Also, comparatively very important are his suites and excerpts from his 15 operas. Korsakov was moreover fond of using Russian folklore and fairy tales in his music, such as Scheherazade.

Nationalistic Style
Korsakov believed, similarly to fellow outspoken composer Balakirev, in creating a nationalistic, Russia-centric style of classical music. The new style was in fact called “Orientalism.” It similarly relied on native Russian materials, exotic scales, and experimental harmonic, melodic and rhythmic procedures. This practice, conversely, ran counter to the developments in Western musical culture.

Musical Developments
Nevertheless, Korsakov developed an appreciation of Western musical techniques after he became a professor of musical composition, harmony, and orchestration at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1871. Moreover, he undertook a rigorous three-year program of self-education and mastered Western methods, incorporating them in conjunction with the influences of Mikhail Glinka and other members of The Five. His techniques of composition and orchestration were additionally enriched by his exposure to the works of Richard Wagner.

Naval Service
Korsakov combined his music career accordingly with a career in the Russian military. He was in the first place an officer in the Russian Navy. In due time, he was appointed as a civilian Inspector of Naval Bands. As a result, Korsakov expanded his knowledge of woodwind and brass playing, which in turn heightened his capabilities in orchestration.

Legacy
Korsakov in due time contributed a significant number of Russian nationalist works. He also prepared, from time to time, compositions by The Five for presentation. This brought their works straightaway into the active classical repertoire as well. He also shaped an entire generation of younger composers during his time as a music educator. Therefore, music historians consider Korsakov as the foremost engineer of what the public considers to be the Russian style of composition. He served, all in all, as a transitional figure between The Five and the classically trained composers who became the norm over time. In addition to the Russians, he forthwith influenced non-Russian composers such as Ravel, Debussy, Dukas, and Respighi.
  • Comments

For flute and guitar

Title by uploader: Fleyt of the bumblebee for flute and guitar


8.00 USD

PDF, 517.4 Kb ID: SM-000340564 Upload date: 05 Sep 2018
Instrumentation
Flute, Classical guitar
Scored for
Duo
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Arranger
David W Solomons
Publisher
David W Solomons
Difficulty
Advanced
Duration
3'0
Year of composition
2018
Genre
Classical/Instrumental
This is Rimsky-Korsakov's Flight of the bumblebee arranged for flute and guitar, but with a Yiddish flavour.
The mode is a sort of harmonic minor, with lots of augmented seconds.
(Fleyt rhymes with "fate" and means flute in Yiddish, hence the pun)


"Fleyt of the bumblebee" is
פלייט פון די בומבלעבעע
in Yiddish (pronounced "fleyt fun di bumblebee")

The pdf contains score and parts
The sound sample is an electronic preview.

Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VLNmX8jX7xM
  • Comments

For flute and guitar

Title by uploader: Fleyt of the bumblebee for flute and guitar


8.00 USD

PDF, 517.3 Kb ID: SM-000293556 Upload date: 07 Aug 2017
Instrumentation
Flute, Classical guitar
Scored for
Duo
Type of score
Full score, Parts
Arranger
David W Solomons
Publisher
David W Solomons
Difficulty
Advanced
Year of composition
2017
Genre
World / Ethnic/Jewish
This is Rimsky-Korsakov's Flight of the bumblebee arranged for flute and guitar, but with a Yiddish flavour.
The mode is a sort of harmonic minor, with lots of augmented seconds.
(Fleyt rhymes with "fate" and means flute in Yiddish, hence the pun)

"Fleyt of the bumblebee" is
פלייט פון די בומבלעבעע
in Yiddish (pronounced "fleyt fun di bumblebee")

The pdf contains score and parts
The sound sample is an electronic preview.
  • Comments

For flute octet

Title by uploader: Hummelflug - Flötenoktett


20.00 USD

Seller Gabi Fellner
PDF, 593.7 Kb ID: SM-000202931 Upload date: 31 Mar 2014
Instrumentation
Flute, Alto Flute, Bass Flute
Scored for
Octet
Type of score
Full score, Parts
Key
A minor
Arranger
Gabi Fellner
Publisher
Gabi Fellner
Difficulty
Advanced
Year of composition
1899
Genre
Classical/Opera
Von der Piccolo- bis zur Basshummel --- alles brummelt und hummelt zusammen!
  • Comments

For flute septet

Title by uploader: Hummelflug - Flötenseptett


18.00 USD

Seller Gabi Fellner
PDF, 584.5 Kb ID: SM-000202932 Upload date: 31 Mar 2014
Instrumentation
Flute, Flute piccolo, Alto Flute, Bass Flute
Scored for
Septet
Type of score
Full score, Parts
Key
A minor
Arranger
Gabi Fellner
Publisher
Gabi Fellner
Difficulty
Advanced
Year of composition
1899
Genre
Classical/Opera
Von der Piccolo- bis zur Basshummel --- alles brummelt und hummelt hier im Ensemble!
  • Comments

For mixed choir

Title by uploader: Полет шмеля

Read license
5.00 USD

PDF, 386.5 Kb ID: SM-000189096 Upload date: 30 Jul 2013
Instrumentation
Mixed choir
Scored for
Choir
Type of score
Vocal score
Key
A minor
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Arranger
Mikhail Gogolin
Publisher
Mikhail Gogolin
Difficulty
Difficult
Duration
1'40
Year of composition
2002
Genre
Classical/Piece
Оркестровая интермедия, написанная Николаем Римским-Корсаковым для его оперы «Сказка о царе Салтане», сочинённой в 1899—1900 годах. Интермедия оканчивает третий акт, в котором Лебедь-птица обращает князя Гвидона в шмеля...

Orchestral interlude, written by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for his Opera «The Tale About Tsar Saltan», composed in 1899-1900,. Interlude graduated from the third act, in which the Swan-bird draws Prince Gvidon in the bumblebee...
  • Comments

Full score

Title by uploader: Flight of the Bumblebee

Read license
6.00 USD

PDF, 353.5 Kb ID: SM-000515284 Upload date: 10 Nov 2020
Instrumentation
Flute, Clarinet, Bassoon, Oboe, Horn, Trombone, Trumpet, Tuba, Violin, Viola, Cello, Double bass, Timpani
Type of score
Full score
Difficulty
Very difficult
Duration
1'16
Year of composition
1900
Genre
Classical/Symphonic music
The Tale of Tsar Saltan is an opera by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov and libretto by Vladimir Belsky, based on the poem of the same name by Aleksandr Pushkin. Written in 1899–1900 to coincide with Pushkin's centenary, it was first performed in 1900 in Moscow, The lengthy full title of both the opera and the poem is The Tale of Tsar Saltan, of his Son the Renowned and Mighty Bogatyr Prince Gvidon Saltanovich and of the Beautiful Princess-Swan. The music is composed in the manner of Rimsky-Korsakov's operas after Snowmaiden, i.e., having a more or less continuous musical texture throughout a tableau (as with Wagner, but with the exception of the separable orchestral introductions mentioned above) and a fairly thorough-going leitmotif system, broken up here and there by song-like passages.


"Flight of the Bumblebee" (Russian: Полёт шмеля) is an orchestral interlude written by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for his opera The Tale of Tsar Saltan, composed in 1899–1900. Its composition is intended to musically evoke the seemingly chaotic and rapidly changing flying pattern of a bumblebee. Despite the piece's being a rather incidental part of the opera, it is today one of the more familiar classical works because of its frequent use in popular culture.

The piece closes Act III, Tableau 1, during which the magic Swan-Bird changes Prince Gvidon Saltanovich (the Tsar's son) into an insect so that he can fly away to visit his father (who does not know that he is alive). Although in the opera the Swan-Bird sings during the first part of the "Flight", her vocal line is melodically uninvolved and easily omitted; this feature, combined with the fact that the number decisively closes the scene, made easy extraction as an orchestral concerto piece possible.
  • Comments

For easy piano sheet with colored notes

Title by uploader: Flight of the Bumble Bee Easy Piano Sheet with Colored Notes
Flight of the Bumblebee: For easy piano sheet with colored notes by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov


4.99 USD

PDF, 1.23 Mb ID: SM-000517551 Upload date: 25 Nov 2020
Instrumentation
Piano
Scored for
Solo
Type of score
Piano score
Arranger
SilverTonalities Sheet Music Services
Publisher
SilverTonalities Sheet Music Services
Difficulty
Easy
Genre
Classical/Arrangement
A SilverTonalities Arrangement!

With Colored Notation to enable Beginner Pianists to read Music quickly and accurately!
  • Comments

For easy piano

Title by uploader: Flight of the Bumble Bee Easy Piano Sheet Music
Flight of the Bumblebee: For easy piano by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov


4.99 USD

PDF, 359.5 Kb ID: SM-000517567 Upload date: 25 Nov 2020
Instrumentation
Piano
Scored for
Solo
Type of score
Piano score
Arranger
SilverTonalities Sheet Music Services
Publisher
SilverTonalities Sheet Music Services
Difficulty
Easy
Genre
Classical/Arrangement
"Flight of the Bumble Bee" by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov for Easy Piano from his opera, The Tale of Tsar Saltan

A SilverTonalities Arrangement!

Easy Note Style Sheet Music

Letter Names of Notes embedded in each Notehead!
  • Comments
comments Dylan Mortega 14 Dec 2015 14:44

On hearing a masterpiece like Flight of the Bumblebee one does realize that music IS the universal language of the mankind@

 
 
   
 
 
   
 
0:00 Полет шмеля
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