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Vocalise, Op.34 No.14

Classical/Arrangement
 
 
   
 

For piano

Printable sheet music file, 1 copy • 4 pages, ID: SM-000096999
4.99
 
USD
Instrumentation
Piano
Genre
Classical
  • Comments

For classical guitar

Title by uploader: S. Rachmaninoff 'Vocalise' Transcribed for Classical Guitar


5.00 USD

PDF, 218.9 Kb ID: SM-000175076 Upload date: 04 Nov 2012
Instrumentation
Classical guitar
Scored for
Solo
Type of score
For a single performer
Key
E minor
Arranger
Hiatama Workshop
Difficulty
Difficult
Duration
5'0
This is a Classical Guitar Transcription of "Vocalise" by S.Rachmaninoff.
The transcription is for solo Guitar.
The Transcription is in E-minor, and played with a Standard Tunning.
  • Comments

For soprano and string orchestra - score, parts

Title by uploader: Rachmaninov Vocalise - arrangement for Soprano & String orchestra - Score & Parts, Op.34 No.14

Read license
5.00 USD

PDF, 486.7 Kb ID: SM-000184733 Upload date: 22 May 2013
Instrumentation
Violin, Viola, Cello, Double bass, Voice
Scored for
Solo, String orchestra
Type of score
Full score, Parts
Key
C sharp minor
Arranger
Giouri Bessonov
Publisher
Giouri Bessonov
Genre
Classical
  • Comments

For violin ensemble and piano

Title by uploader: S. Rachmaninoff Vocalise. Arranged for Violin Ensemble and Piano


10.00 USD

PDF, 659.6 Kb ID: SM-000184845 Upload date: 24 May 2013
Instrumentation
Piano, Violin
Scored for
Large ensemble (9 or more players)
Type of score
Full score, Parts
Arranger
Aleksey Simonowski
Publisher
Aleksey Simonowski
Genre
Classical/Piece
www.youtube.com/watch?v=ycfkOpbC-x0
  • Comments

For mixed choir, cello and piano

Title by uploader: Vocalise, Op.34 No.14

Read license
149.00 USD

PDF, 511.8 Kb ID: SM-000182115 Upload date: 01 Apr 2013
Instrumentation
Piano, Cello, Mixed choir: Soprano, Alto, Tenor, Bass
Type of score
Full score
Key
A minor
Arranger
Mikhail Zeiger
Difficulty
Advanced
Duration
6'48
Year of composition
1912
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
Arr. by Mikhail Zeiger for Mixed Choir, Cello and Piano
  • Comments

For solo and symphonic orchestra

Title by uploader: Vocalise, Op.34 No.14


5.00 USD

Seller S.N.N.
PDF, 361.4 Kb ID: SM-000204767 Upload date: 16 Apr 2014
Instrumentation
Flute, Clarinet, Bassoon, Oboe, Horn, Violin, Viola, Cello, Double bass, Soprano
Scored for
Solo, Symphonic orchestra
Type of score
Full score
Key
C sharp minor
Arranger
Sergei Rachmaninoff
Difficulty
Difficult
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
  • Comments

For voice and piano

Title by uploader: Vocalise, Op.34 No.14


1.45 USD

Seller PlaceArt
PDF, 1.02 Mb ID: SM-000207345 Upload date: 13 Jun 2014
Instrumentation
Piano, Voice
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Piano-vocal score
Key
A minor
Publisher
Boosey & Hawkes
Difficulty
Advanced
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
  • Comments

For flute and piano

Title by uploader: Vocalise, for Flute and Piano, Op.34 No.14


1.45 USD

Seller PlaceArt
PDF, 422.7 Kb ID: SM-000207346 Upload date: 13 Jun 2014
Instrumentation
Piano, Flute
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Solo part
Key
G minor
Difficulty
Advanced
  • Comments

For string orchestra

Title by uploader: Rachmaninoff - Vocalise, Op.34 No.14


6.00 USD

Seller Elena Ionova
PDF, 377.7 Kb ID: SM-000230918 Upload date: 21 Aug 2015
Instrumentation
Violin, Viola, Cello, Double bass
Scored for
String orchestra
Type of score
Parts
Year of composition
1912
Genre
Classical/Instrumental
  • Comments

For piano four hands - score and parts

Title by uploader: Rachmaninoff - Vocalise - piano 4 hands - Score and parts, Op.34 No.14

Read license
6.95 USD

Seller Peter Petrof
PDF, 1.24 Mb ID: SM-000249463 Upload date: 10 Jun 2016
Instrumentation
Piano
Scored for
1 piano, 4 hands
Type of score
Full score, First part, Second part
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Arranger
Peter Petrof
Publisher
Peter Petrof
Difficulty
Advanced
Duration
6'0
Genre
Classical/Instrumental
  • Comments

For soprano and piano (c moll)

Title by uploader: Вокализ (c-moll), Соч.34 No.4


1.99 USD

Seller S.N.N.
PDF, 240.0 Kb ID: SM-000343999 Upload date: 09 Nov 2018
Instrumentation
Piano, Soprano
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Piano-vocal score
Key
C minor
Publisher
S.N.N.
Difficulty
Difficult
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
  • Comments

For tenor saxophone and piano

Title by uploader: Вокализ (для саксофона тенора или сопрано), Op.34 No.14


Free

Uploader Aquarius-Ru
PDF, 510.6 Kb ID: SM-000338778 Upload date: 27 Jul 2018
Instrumentation
Piano, Tenor Saxophone, Soprano Saxophone
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Solo part
Key
D minor
Arranger
Aquarius-Ru
Difficulty
Medium
Year of composition
1915
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
Адаптация для саксофона in B (тенора или сопрано) и фортепиано
В файле находятся:
Партитура + Клавир (в концертном строе) + Партия солиста

© Сергей Васильевич Рахманинов, 1915
  • Comments

For symphonic orchestra

Title by uploader: С. Рахманинов 'Вокализ' авторская версия для симф. оркестра


2.70 USD

PDF, 8.08 Mb ID: SM-000373141 Upload date: 10 Oct 2019
Instrumentation
Flute, Clarinet, Bassoon, Oboe, Cor anglais, Horn, Violin, Viola, Cello, Double bass
Scored for
Symphonic orchestra
Type of score
Full score
Publisher
Boosey & Hawkes
Genre
Classical/Symphonic music
Партитура С. Рахманинов "Вокализ" авторская версия для симф. оркестра
  • Comments

For voice and strings

Title by uploader: Vocalise, Op.34 No.14

Read license
10.00 USD

PDF, 1.63 Mb ID: SM-000377935 Upload date: 25 Dec 2019
Instrumentation
Violin, Viola, Cello, Double bass, Soprano
Type of score
Full score, Parts
Arranger
Sergei Zheludkov
Publisher
Sergei Zheludkov
Year of composition
2018
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
  • Comments

For string orchestra

Title by uploader: Vocalise No.14, Op.34


12.00 USD

Read license
6.00 USD

ZIP, 1.27 Mb ID: SM-000380660 Upload date: 04 Feb 2020
Instrumentation
Violin, Viola, Cello, Double bass
Scored for
Solo, String orchestra
Type of score
Full score, Parts
Key
E minor
Arranger
Mladen Spasinovici
Publisher
Mladen Spasinovici
Difficulty
Advanced
Duration
5'40
Year of composition
1912
A very touching piece arranged for cello soloist and string orchestra.
  • Comments

For horn quintet

Title by uploader: Vocalise für HB Quintett
Vocalise, Op.34 No.14: For horn quintet by Sergei Rachmaninoff


24.00 USD

PDF, 337.8 Kb ID: SM-000523076 Upload date: 13 Apr 2021
Instrumentation
Flute, Clarinet, Bassoon, Oboe, Horn
Scored for
Wind ensemble
Type of score
Full score, Parts
Key
D minor
Arranger
Dieter Angerer
Publisher
Dieter Angerer
Difficulty
Difficult
Duration
4'52
Genre
Classical/Chamber music
Eines der schönsten Stücke aus der Feder von Sergei Rachmaninov hier in einer Bearbeitung für Holzbläserquintett.
Viel Freude an dem modulationsreichen, polyphonen Stück.
  • Comments

For cello. In the original key of c sharp minor and in e minor

Title by uploader: Vocalise, edited for cello. In the original key of c# minor and in e minor

Read license
Free

PDF, 289.1 Kb ID: SM-000381551 Upload date: 01 Mar 2020
Instrumentation
Cello
Scored for
Solo
Type of score
For a single performer
Arranger
Yellow Cello Music
Publisher
Yellow Cello Music
Difficulty
Medium
Cellists often play this in e minor, but I love it in c# minor! Pick your favorite. Cello part only; piano part is not included.
  • Comments

For voice, violin and piano

Title by uploader: Вокализ

Read license
6.50 USD

PDF, 661.0 Kb ID: SM-000498014 Upload date: 21 May 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Violin, Soprano
Scored for
Trio
Type of score
Full score
Key
C sharp minor
Arranger
Vladislav Martynenko
Publisher
Vladislav Martynenko
Genre
Classical/Romance
Сергей Васильевич Рахманинов - Вокализ ор. 34 № 14
Переложение для сопрано, скрипки и фортепиано - Владислав Мартыненко
  • Comments

For Alto Clarinet and Piano

Title by uploader: Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Alto Clarinet and Piano, Op.34 No.14

Read license
24.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.09 Mb ID: SM-000508381 Upload date: 24 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Alto Clarinet
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Medium
Duration
6'33
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Alto Clarinet and Piano
Intermediate level - Digital Download
Composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943). Arranged by James M. Guthrie, ASCAP. Romantic Period, Repertoire, Technique Training, Wedding, Recital. Score, Set of Parts. 13 pages.
Published by Jmsgu3 Publications S0.336329. Sergei Rachmaninoff: Vocalise Op. 34 No. 14. Score: 7 pages, 41 measures. Duration: ca. 6:33. Solo part: 2 pages, Piano part: 4 pages. Very famous composition with a distinctly melancholy flavor. Suitable for Lent or Easter meditations, receptions, weddings, recitals, school performances, and concert encores.

Vocalise is a song that Sergei Rachmaninoff in fact composed 1915. It represents, as can be seen, the final entry of his 14 Romances, Op. 34. He wrote it generally speaking for high voice with piano accompaniment. There are no words, but with this in mind, it is usually sung on a vowel that the singer chooses. He provided a dedication by and large to the famous soprano Antonina Nezhdanova.

Rachmaninoff Background
Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873 –1943) was a famous Russian concert pianist, and in fact also a composer, during the Romantic period. Some of his compositions are in short among the most famous in the entire Romantic repertoire. Rachmaninoff was born into a musical family on the whole and began studying the piano at only four years of age. In due time, he graduated from Moscow Conservatory in 1892. By then, he had in essence already composed several works for piano and a few orchestral pieces as well. However, In 1897, music critics reacted negatively to his first symphony. As a result, Rachmaninoff was clinically depressed for four years. During this time, he composed very little. Eventually, successful therapy allowed him to complete his Piano Concerto No. 2. In contrast, it was ardently received by the critics. Rachmaninoff conducted at the Bolshoi Theatre, then eventually relocated to Dresden, Germany. During this time, he first toured the United States

Move to America
Rachmaninoff and his family meanwhile left Russia following the Russian Revolution in 1918. They settled, to begin with, in New York City. He performed on the piano and by and large conducted performances of his music for a living. For a while, his busy tour schedule meant he had, on the whole, no time to compose. In fact, between 1918 and 1943, he finished just six works, including Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Symphony No. 3, and Symphonic Dances. Generally speaking, he moved to Beverly Hills in 1942 for health reasons. Rachmaninoff was granted American citizenship ultimately one month before he died.

Legacy
In Rachmaninoff's compositions, we see all in all the early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev, Mussorgsky, and other Russian composers. These influences, in any event, seem to relinquish to his personal style of melodicism and orchestral color. Rachmaninoff obviously highlighted the piano often in his works. In essence, he employed his pianistic skills to explore the more sensitive potentials of the instrument.
  • Comments

For Alto Flute and Piano

Title by uploader: Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Alto Flute and Piano, Op.34 No.14

Read license
24.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.09 Mb ID: SM-000508382 Upload date: 24 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Alto Flute
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Medium
Duration
6'33
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Alto Flute and Piano
Intermediate level - Digital Download
Composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943). Arranged by James M. Guthrie, ASCAP. Romantic Period, Repertoire, Technique Training, Wedding, Recital. Score, Set of Parts. 13 pages.
Published by Jmsgu3 Publications S0.336325 . Sergei Rachmaninoff: Vocalise Op. 34 No. 14. Score: 7 pages, 41 measures. Duration: ca. 6:33. Solo part: 2 pages, Piano part: 4 pages. Very famous composition with a distinctly melancholy flavor. Suitable for Lent or Easter meditations, receptions, weddings, recitals, school performances, and concert encores.

Vocalise is a song that Sergei Rachmaninoff in fact composed 1915. It represents, as can be seen, the final entry of his 14 Romances, Op. 34. He wrote it generally speaking for high voice with piano accompaniment. There are no words, but with this in mind, it is usually sung on a vowel that the singer chooses. He provided a dedication by and large to the famous soprano Antonina Nezhdanova.

Rachmaninoff Background
Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873 –1943) was a famous Russian concert pianist, and in fact also a composer, during the Romantic period. Some of his compositions are in short among the most famous in the entire Romantic repertoire. Rachmaninoff was born into a musical family on the whole and began studying the piano at only four years of age. In due time, he graduated from Moscow Conservatory in 1892. By then, he had in essence already composed several works for piano and a few orchestral pieces as well. However, In 1897, music critics reacted negatively to his first symphony. As a result, Rachmaninoff was clinically depressed for four years. During this time, he composed very little. Eventually, successful therapy allowed him to complete his Piano Concerto No. 2. In contrast, it was ardently received by the critics. Rachmaninoff conducted at the Bolshoi Theatre, then eventually relocated to Dresden, Germany. During this time, he first toured the United States

Move to America
Rachmaninoff and his family meanwhile left Russia following the Russian Revolution in 1918. They settled, to begin with, in New York City. He performed on the piano and by and large conducted performances of his music for a living. For a while, his busy tour schedule meant he had, on the whole, no time to compose. In fact, between 1918 and 1943, he finished just six works, including Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Symphony No. 3, and Symphonic Dances. Generally speaking, he moved to Beverly Hills in 1942 for health reasons. Rachmaninoff was granted American citizenship ultimately one month before he died.

Legacy
In Rachmaninoff's compositions, we see all in all the early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev, Mussorgsky, and other Russian composers. These influences, in any event, seem to relinquish to his personal style of melodicism and orchestral color. Rachmaninoff obviously highlighted the piano often in his works. In essence, he employed his pianistic skills to explore the more sensitive potentials of the instrument.
  • Comments

For Alto Sax and Piano

Title by uploader: Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Alto Sax and Piano, Op.34 No.14

Read license
24.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.08 Mb ID: SM-000508383 Upload date: 24 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Alto Saxophone
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Medium
Duration
6'33
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Alto Sax and Piano
Intermediate level - Digital Download
Composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943). Arranged by James M. Guthrie, ASCAP. Romantic Period, Repertoire, Technique Training, Wedding, Recital. Score, Set of Parts. 13 pages.
Published by Jmsgu3 Publications S0.336323. Sergei Rachmaninoff: Vocalise Op. 34 No. 14. Score: 7 pages, 41 measures. Duration: ca. 6:33. Solo part: 2 pages, Piano part: 4 pages. Very famous composition with a distinctly melancholy flavor. Suitable for Lent or Easter meditations, receptions, weddings, recitals, school performances, and concert encores.

Vocalise is a song that Sergei Rachmaninoff in fact composed 1915. It represents, as can be seen, the final entry of his 14 Romances, Op. 34. He wrote it generally speaking for high voice with piano accompaniment. There are no words, but with this in mind, it is usually sung on a vowel that the singer chooses. He provided a dedication by and large to the famous soprano Antonina Nezhdanova.

Rachmaninoff Background
Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873 –1943) was a famous Russian concert pianist, and in fact also a composer, during the Romantic period. Some of his compositions are in short among the most famous in the entire Romantic repertoire. Rachmaninoff was born into a musical family on the whole and began studying the piano at only four years of age. In due time, he graduated from Moscow Conservatory in 1892. By then, he had in essence already composed several works for piano and a few orchestral pieces as well. However, In 1897, music critics reacted negatively to his first symphony. As a result, Rachmaninoff was clinically depressed for four years. During this time, he composed very little. Eventually, successful therapy allowed him to complete his Piano Concerto No. 2. In contrast, it was ardently received by the critics. Rachmaninoff conducted at the Bolshoi Theatre, then eventually relocated to Dresden, Germany. During this time, he first toured the United States

Move to America
Rachmaninoff and his family meanwhile left Russia following the Russian Revolution in 1918. They settled, to begin with, in New York City. He performed on the piano and by and large conducted performances of his music for a living. For a while, his busy tour schedule meant he had, on the whole, no time to compose. In fact, between 1918 and 1943, he finished just six works, including Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Symphony No. 3, and Symphonic Dances. Generally speaking, he moved to Beverly Hills in 1942 for health reasons. Rachmaninoff was granted American citizenship ultimately one month before he died.

Legacy
In Rachmaninoff's compositions, we see all in all the early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev, Mussorgsky, and other Russian composers. These influences, in any event, seem to relinquish to his personal style of melodicism and orchestral color. Rachmaninoff obviously highlighted the piano often in his works. In essence, he employed his pianistic skills to explore the more sensitive potentials of the instrument.
  • Comments

For Bass Clarinet and Piano

Title by uploader: Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Bass Clarinet and Piano, Op.34 No.14

Read license
24.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.09 Mb ID: SM-000508384 Upload date: 24 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Bass Clarinet
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Medium
Duration
6'33
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Bass Clarinet and Piano
Intermediate level - Digital Download
Composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943). Arranged by James M. Guthrie, ASCAP. Romantic Period, Repertoire, Technique Training, Wedding, Recital. Score, Set of Parts. 13 pages.
Published by Jmsgu3 Publications S0.336315. Sergei Rachmaninoff: Vocalise Op. 34 No. 14. Score: 7 pages, 41 measures. Duration: ca. 6:33. Solo part: 2 pages, Piano part: 4 pages. Very famous composition with a distinctly melancholy flavor. Suitable for Lent or Easter meditations, receptions, weddings, recitals, school performances, and concert encores.

Vocalise is a song that Sergei Rachmaninoff in fact composed 1915. It represents, as can be seen, the final entry of his 14 Romances, Op. 34. He wrote it generally speaking for high voice with piano accompaniment. There are no words, but with this in mind, it is usually sung on a vowel that the singer chooses. He provided a dedication by and large to the famous soprano Antonina Nezhdanova.

Rachmaninoff Background
Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873 –1943) was a famous Russian concert pianist, and in fact also a composer, during the Romantic period. Some of his compositions are in short among the most famous in the entire Romantic repertoire. Rachmaninoff was born into a musical family on the whole and began studying the piano at only four years of age. In due time, he graduated from Moscow Conservatory in 1892. By then, he had in essence already composed several works for piano and a few orchestral pieces as well. However, In 1897, music critics reacted negatively to his first symphony. As a result, Rachmaninoff was clinically depressed for four years. During this time, he composed very little. Eventually, successful therapy allowed him to complete his Piano Concerto No. 2. In contrast, it was ardently received by the critics. Rachmaninoff conducted at the Bolshoi Theatre, then eventually relocated to Dresden, Germany. During this time, he first toured the United States

Move to America
Rachmaninoff and his family meanwhile left Russia following the Russian Revolution in 1918. They settled, to begin with, in New York City. He performed on the piano and by and large conducted performances of his music for a living. For a while, his busy tour schedule meant he had, on the whole, no time to compose. In fact, between 1918 and 1943, he finished just six works, including Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Symphony No. 3, and Symphonic Dances. Generally speaking, he moved to Beverly Hills in 1942 for health reasons. Rachmaninoff was granted American citizenship ultimately one month before he died.

Legacy
In Rachmaninoff's compositions, we see all in all the early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev, Mussorgsky, and other Russian composers. These influences, in any event, seem to relinquish to his personal style of melodicism and orchestral color. Rachmaninoff obviously highlighted the piano often in his works. In essence, he employed his pianistic skills to explore the more sensitive potentials of the instrument.
  • Comments

For Baritone Horn and Piano

Title by uploader: Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Baritone Horn and Piano, Op.34 No.14

Read license
24.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.09 Mb ID: SM-000508385 Upload date: 24 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Baritone horn
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Medium
Duration
6'33
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Baritone Horn and Piano
Intermediate level - Digital Download
Composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943). Arranged by James M. Guthrie, ASCAP. Romantic Period, Repertoire, Technique Training, Wedding, Recital. Score, Set of Parts. 13 pages.
Published by Jmsgu3 Publications S0.336313. Sergei Rachmaninoff: Vocalise Op. 34 No. 14. Score: 7 pages, 41 measures. Duration: ca. 6:33. Solo part: 2 pages, Piano part: 4 pages. Very famous composition with a distinctly melancholy flavor. Suitable for Lent or Easter meditations, receptions, weddings, recitals, school performances, and concert encores.

Vocalise is a song that Sergei Rachmaninoff in fact composed 1915. It represents, as can be seen, the final entry of his 14 Romances, Op. 34. He wrote it generally speaking for high voice with piano accompaniment. There are no words, but with this in mind, it is usually sung on a vowel that the singer chooses. He provided a dedication by and large to the famous soprano Antonina Nezhdanova.

Rachmaninoff Background
Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873 –1943) was a famous Russian concert pianist, and in fact also a composer, during the Romantic period. Some of his compositions are in short among the most famous in the entire Romantic repertoire. Rachmaninoff was born into a musical family on the whole and began studying the piano at only four years of age. In due time, he graduated from Moscow Conservatory in 1892. By then, he had in essence already composed several works for piano and a few orchestral pieces as well. However, In 1897, music critics reacted negatively to his first symphony. As a result, Rachmaninoff was clinically depressed for four years. During this time, he composed very little. Eventually, successful therapy allowed him to complete his Piano Concerto No. 2. In contrast, it was ardently received by the critics. Rachmaninoff conducted at the Bolshoi Theatre, then eventually relocated to Dresden, Germany. During this time, he first toured the United States

Move to America
Rachmaninoff and his family meanwhile left Russia following the Russian Revolution in 1918. They settled, to begin with, in New York City. He performed on the piano and by and large conducted performances of his music for a living. For a while, his busy tour schedule meant he had, on the whole, no time to compose. In fact, between 1918 and 1943, he finished just six works, including Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Symphony No. 3, and Symphonic Dances. Generally speaking, he moved to Beverly Hills in 1942 for health reasons. Rachmaninoff was granted American citizenship ultimately one month before he died.

Legacy
In Rachmaninoff's compositions, we see all in all the early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev, Mussorgsky, and other Russian composers. These influences, in any event, seem to relinquish to his personal style of melodicism and orchestral color. Rachmaninoff obviously highlighted the piano often in his works. In essence, he employed his pianistic skills to explore the more sensitive potentials of the instrument.
  • Comments

For Bassoon and Piano

Title by uploader: Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Bassoon and Piano, Op.34 No.14

Read license
24.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.08 Mb ID: SM-000508386 Upload date: 24 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Bassoon
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Duration
6'33
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Bassoon and Piano
Intermediate level - Digital Download
Composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943). Arranged by James M. Guthrie, ASCAP. Romantic Period, Repertoire, Technique Training, Wedding, Recital. Score, Set of Parts. 13 pages.
Published by Jmsgu3 Publications S0.336311. Sergei Rachmaninoff: Vocalise Op. 34 No. 14. Score: 7 pages, 41 measures. Duration: ca. 6:33. Solo part: 2 pages, Piano part: 4 pages. Very famous composition with a distinctly melancholy flavor. Suitable for Lent or Easter meditations, receptions, weddings, recitals, school performances, and concert encores.

Vocalise is a song that Sergei Rachmaninoff in fact composed 1915. It represents, as can be seen, the final entry of his 14 Romances, Op. 34. He wrote it generally speaking for high voice with piano accompaniment. There are no words, but with this in mind, it is usually sung on a vowel that the singer chooses. He provided a dedication by and large to the famous soprano Antonina Nezhdanova.

Rachmaninoff Background
Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873 –1943) was a famous Russian concert pianist, and in fact also a composer, during the Romantic period. Some of his compositions are in short among the most famous in the entire Romantic repertoire. Rachmaninoff was born into a musical family on the whole and began studying the piano at only four years of age. In due time, he graduated from Moscow Conservatory in 1892. By then, he had in essence already composed several works for piano and a few orchestral pieces as well. However, In 1897, music critics reacted negatively to his first symphony. As a result, Rachmaninoff was clinically depressed for four years. During this time, he composed very little. Eventually, successful therapy allowed him to complete his Piano Concerto No. 2. In contrast, it was ardently received by the critics. Rachmaninoff conducted at the Bolshoi Theatre, then eventually relocated to Dresden, Germany. During this time, he first toured the United States

Move to America
Rachmaninoff and his family meanwhile left Russia following the Russian Revolution in 1918. They settled, to begin with, in New York City. He performed on the piano and by and large conducted performances of his music for a living. For a while, his busy tour schedule meant he had, on the whole, no time to compose. In fact, between 1918 and 1943, he finished just six works, including Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Symphony No. 3, and Symphonic Dances. Generally speaking, he moved to Beverly Hills in 1942 for health reasons. Rachmaninoff was granted American citizenship ultimately one month before he died.

Legacy
In Rachmaninoff's compositions, we see all in all the early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev, Mussorgsky, and other Russian composers. These influences, in any event, seem to relinquish to his personal style of melodicism and orchestral color. Rachmaninoff obviously highlighted the piano often in his works. In essence, he employed his pianistic skills to explore the more sensitive potentials of the instrument.
  • Comments

For Baritone Sax and Piano

Title by uploader: Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Baritone Sax and Piano, Op.34 No.14

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24.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.09 Mb ID: SM-000508387 Upload date: 24 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Baritone Saxophone
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Medium
Duration
6'33
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Baritone Sax and Piano
Intermediate level - Digital Download
Composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943). Arranged by James M. Guthrie, ASCAP. Romantic Period, Repertoire, Technique Training, Wedding, Recital. Score, Set of Parts. 13 pages.
Published by Jmsgu3 Publications S0.336309. Sergei Rachmaninoff: Vocalise Op. 34 No. 14. Score: 7 pages, 41 measures. Duration: ca. 6:33. Solo part: 2 pages, Piano part: 4 pages. Very famous composition with a distinctly melancholy flavor. Suitable for Lent or Easter meditations, receptions, weddings, recitals, school performances, and concert encores.

Vocalise is a song that Sergei Rachmaninoff in fact composed 1915. It represents, as can be seen, the final entry of his 14 Romances, Op. 34. He wrote it generally speaking for high voice with piano accompaniment. There are no words, but with this in mind, it is usually sung on a vowel that the singer chooses. He provided a dedication by and large to the famous soprano Antonina Nezhdanova.

Rachmaninoff Background
Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873 –1943) was a famous Russian concert pianist, and in fact also a composer, during the Romantic period. Some of his compositions are in short among the most famous in the entire Romantic repertoire. Rachmaninoff was born into a musical family on the whole and began studying the piano at only four years of age. In due time, he graduated from Moscow Conservatory in 1892. By then, he had in essence already composed several works for piano and a few orchestral pieces as well. However, In 1897, music critics reacted negatively to his first symphony. As a result, Rachmaninoff was clinically depressed for four years. During this time, he composed very little. Eventually, successful therapy allowed him to complete his Piano Concerto No. 2. In contrast, it was ardently received by the critics. Rachmaninoff conducted at the Bolshoi Theatre, then eventually relocated to Dresden, Germany. During this time, he first toured the United States

Move to America
Rachmaninoff and his family meanwhile left Russia following the Russian Revolution in 1918. They settled, to begin with, in New York City. He performed on the piano and by and large conducted performances of his music for a living. For a while, his busy tour schedule meant he had, on the whole, no time to compose. In fact, between 1918 and 1943, he finished just six works, including Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Symphony No. 3, and Symphonic Dances. Generally speaking, he moved to Beverly Hills in 1942 for health reasons. Rachmaninoff was granted American citizenship ultimately one month before he died.

Legacy
In Rachmaninoff's compositions, we see all in all the early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev, Mussorgsky, and other Russian composers. These influences, in any event, seem to relinquish to his personal style of melodicism and orchestral color. Rachmaninoff obviously highlighted the piano often in his works. In essence, he employed his pianistic skills to explore the more sensitive potentials of the instrument.
  • Comments

For Clarinet and Piano

Title by uploader: Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Clarinet and Piano, Op.34 No.14

Read license
24.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.09 Mb ID: SM-000508388 Upload date: 24 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Clarinet
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Medium
Duration
6'33
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Clarinet and Piano
Intermediate level - Digital Download
Composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943). Arranged by James M. Guthrie, ASCAP. Romantic Period, Repertoire, Technique Training, Wedding, Recital. Score, Set of Parts. 13 pages.
Published by Jmsgu3 Publications S0.336305. Sergei Rachmaninoff: Vocalise Op. 34 No. 14. Score: 7 pages, 41 measures. Duration: ca. 6:33. Solo part: 2 pages, Piano part: 4 pages. Very famous composition with a distinctly melancholy flavor. Suitable for Lent or Easter meditations, receptions, weddings, recitals, school performances, and concert encores.

Vocalise is a song that Sergei Rachmaninoff in fact composed 1915. It represents, as can be seen, the final entry of his 14 Romances, Op. 34. He wrote it generally speaking for high voice with piano accompaniment. There are no words, but with this in mind, it is usually sung on a vowel that the singer chooses. He provided a dedication by and large to the famous soprano Antonina Nezhdanova.

Rachmaninoff Background
Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873 –1943) was a famous Russian concert pianist, and in fact also a composer, during the Romantic period. Some of his compositions are in short among the most famous in the entire Romantic repertoire. Rachmaninoff was born into a musical family on the whole and began studying the piano at only four years of age. In due time, he graduated from Moscow Conservatory in 1892. By then, he had in essence already composed several works for piano and a few orchestral pieces as well. However, In 1897, music critics reacted negatively to his first symphony. As a result, Rachmaninoff was clinically depressed for four years. During this time, he composed very little. Eventually, successful therapy allowed him to complete his Piano Concerto No. 2. In contrast, it was ardently received by the critics. Rachmaninoff conducted at the Bolshoi Theatre, then eventually relocated to Dresden, Germany. During this time, he first toured the United States

Move to America
Rachmaninoff and his family meanwhile left Russia following the Russian Revolution in 1918. They settled, to begin with, in New York City. He performed on the piano and by and large conducted performances of his music for a living. For a while, his busy tour schedule meant he had, on the whole, no time to compose. In fact, between 1918 and 1943, he finished just six works, including Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Symphony No. 3, and Symphonic Dances. Generally speaking, he moved to Beverly Hills in 1942 for health reasons. Rachmaninoff was granted American citizenship ultimately one month before he died.

Legacy
In Rachmaninoff's compositions, we see all in all the early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev, Mussorgsky, and other Russian composers. These influences, in any event, seem to relinquish to his personal style of melodicism and orchestral color. Rachmaninoff obviously highlighted the piano often in his works. In essence, he employed his pianistic skills to explore the more sensitive potentials of the instrument.
  • Comments

For English Horn and Piano

Title by uploader: Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for English Horn and Piano, Op.34 No.14

Read license
24.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.09 Mb ID: SM-000508389 Upload date: 24 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Cor anglais
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Medium
Duration
6'33
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for English Horn and Piano
Intermediate level - Digital Download
Composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943). Arranged by James M. Guthrie, ASCAP. Romantic Period, Repertoire, Technique Training, Wedding, Recital. Score, Set of Parts. 13 pages.
Published by Jmsgu3 Publications S0.336299. Sergei Rachmaninoff: Vocalise Op. 34 No. 14. Score: 7 pages, 41 measures. Duration: ca. 6:33. Solo part: 2 pages, Piano part: 4 pages. Very famous composition with a distinctly melancholy flavor. Suitable for Lent or Easter meditations, receptions, weddings, recitals, school performances, and concert encores.

Vocalise is a song that Sergei Rachmaninoff in fact composed 1915. It represents, as can be seen, the final entry of his 14 Romances, Op. 34. He wrote it generally speaking for high voice with piano accompaniment. There are no words, but with this in mind, it is usually sung on a vowel that the singer chooses. He provided a dedication by and large to the famous soprano Antonina Nezhdanova.

Rachmaninoff Background
Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873 –1943) was a famous Russian concert pianist, and in fact also a composer, during the Romantic period. Some of his compositions are in short among the most famous in the entire Romantic repertoire. Rachmaninoff was born into a musical family on the whole and began studying the piano at only four years of age. In due time, he graduated from Moscow Conservatory in 1892. By then, he had in essence already composed several works for piano and a few orchestral pieces as well. However, In 1897, music critics reacted negatively to his first symphony. As a result, Rachmaninoff was clinically depressed for four years. During this time, he composed very little. Eventually, successful therapy allowed him to complete his Piano Concerto No. 2. In contrast, it was ardently received by the critics. Rachmaninoff conducted at the Bolshoi Theatre, then eventually relocated to Dresden, Germany. During this time, he first toured the United States

Move to America
Rachmaninoff and his family meanwhile left Russia following the Russian Revolution in 1918. They settled, to begin with, in New York City. He performed on the piano and by and large conducted performances of his music for a living. For a while, his busy tour schedule meant he had, on the whole, no time to compose. In fact, between 1918 and 1943, he finished just six works, including Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Symphony No. 3, and Symphonic Dances. Generally speaking, he moved to Beverly Hills in 1942 for health reasons. Rachmaninoff was granted American citizenship ultimately one month before he died.

Legacy
In Rachmaninoff's compositions, we see all in all the early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev, Mussorgsky, and other Russian composers. These influences, in any event, seem to relinquish to his personal style of melodicism and orchestral color. Rachmaninoff obviously highlighted the piano often in his works. In essence, he employed his pianistic skills to explore the more sensitive potentials of the instrument.
  • Comments

For Euphonium and Piano

Title by uploader: Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Euphonium and Piano, Op.34 No.14

Read license
24.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.08 Mb ID: SM-000508390 Upload date: 24 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Euphonium
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Medium
Duration
6'33
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Euphonium and Piano
Intermediate level - Digital Download
Composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943). Arranged by James M. Guthrie, ASCAP. Romantic Period, Repertoire, Technique Training, Wedding, Recital. Score, Set of Parts. 13 pages.
Published by Jmsgu3 Publications S0.336295. Sergei Rachmaninoff: Vocalise Op. 34 No. 14. Score: 7 pages, 41 measures. Duration: ca. 6:33. Solo part: 2 pages, Piano part: 4 pages. Very famous composition with a distinctly melancholy flavor. Suitable for Lent or Easter meditations, receptions, weddings, recitals, school performances, and concert encores.

Vocalise is a song that Sergei Rachmaninoff in fact composed 1915. It represents, as can be seen, the final entry of his 14 Romances, Op. 34. He wrote it generally speaking for high voice with piano accompaniment. There are no words, but with this in mind, it is usually sung on a vowel that the singer chooses. He provided a dedication by and large to the famous soprano Antonina Nezhdanova.

Rachmaninoff Background
Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873 –1943) was a famous Russian concert pianist, and in fact also a composer, during the Romantic period. Some of his compositions are in short among the most famous in the entire Romantic repertoire. Rachmaninoff was born into a musical family on the whole and began studying the piano at only four years of age. In due time, he graduated from Moscow Conservatory in 1892. By then, he had in essence already composed several works for piano and a few orchestral pieces as well. However, In 1897, music critics reacted negatively to his first symphony. As a result, Rachmaninoff was clinically depressed for four years. During this time, he composed very little. Eventually, successful therapy allowed him to complete his Piano Concerto No. 2. In contrast, it was ardently received by the critics. Rachmaninoff conducted at the Bolshoi Theatre, then eventually relocated to Dresden, Germany. During this time, he first toured the United States

Move to America
Rachmaninoff and his family meanwhile left Russia following the Russian Revolution in 1918. They settled, to begin with, in New York City. He performed on the piano and by and large conducted performances of his music for a living. For a while, his busy tour schedule meant he had, on the whole, no time to compose. In fact, between 1918 and 1943, he finished just six works, including Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Symphony No. 3, and Symphonic Dances. Generally speaking, he moved to Beverly Hills in 1942 for health reasons. Rachmaninoff was granted American citizenship ultimately one month before he died.

Legacy
In Rachmaninoff's compositions, we see all in all the early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev, Mussorgsky, and other Russian composers. These influences, in any event, seem to relinquish to his personal style of melodicism and orchestral color. Rachmaninoff obviously highlighted the piano often in his works. In essence, he employed his pianistic skills to explore the more sensitive potentials of the instrument.
  • Comments

For Flute and Piano

Title by uploader: Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Flute and Piano, Op.34 No.14

Read license
24.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.08 Mb ID: SM-000508391 Upload date: 24 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Flute
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Medium
Duration
6'33
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Flute and Piano
Intermediate level - Digital Download
Composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943). Arranged by James M. Guthrie, ASCAP. Romantic Period, Repertoire, Technique Training, Wedding, Recital. Score, Set of Parts. 13 pages.
Published by Jmsgu3 Publications S0.336291. Sergei Rachmaninoff: Vocalise Op. 34 No. 14. Score: 7 pages, 41 measures. Duration: ca. 6:33. Solo part: 2 pages, Piano part: 4 pages. Very famous composition with a distinctly melancholy flavor. Suitable for Lent or Easter meditations, receptions, weddings, recitals, school performances, and concert encores.

Vocalise is a song that Sergei Rachmaninoff in fact composed 1915. It represents, as can be seen, the final entry of his 14 Romances, Op. 34. He wrote it generally speaking for high voice with piano accompaniment. There are no words, but with this in mind, it is usually sung on a vowel that the singer chooses. He provided a dedication by and large to the famous soprano Antonina Nezhdanova.

Rachmaninoff Background
Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873 –1943) was a famous Russian concert pianist, and in fact also a composer, during the Romantic period. Some of his compositions are in short among the most famous in the entire Romantic repertoire. Rachmaninoff was born into a musical family on the whole and began studying the piano at only four years of age. In due time, he graduated from Moscow Conservatory in 1892. By then, he had in essence already composed several works for piano and a few orchestral pieces as well. However, In 1897, music critics reacted negatively to his first symphony. As a result, Rachmaninoff was clinically depressed for four years. During this time, he composed very little. Eventually, successful therapy allowed him to complete his Piano Concerto No. 2. In contrast, it was ardently received by the critics. Rachmaninoff conducted at the Bolshoi Theatre, then eventually relocated to Dresden, Germany. During this time, he first toured the United States

Move to America
Rachmaninoff and his family meanwhile left Russia following the Russian Revolution in 1918. They settled, to begin with, in New York City. He performed on the piano and by and large conducted performances of his music for a living. For a while, his busy tour schedule meant he had, on the whole, no time to compose. In fact, between 1918 and 1943, he finished just six works, including Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Symphony No. 3, and Symphonic Dances. Generally speaking, he moved to Beverly Hills in 1942 for health reasons. Rachmaninoff was granted American citizenship ultimately one month before he died.

Legacy
In Rachmaninoff's compositions, we see all in all the early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev, Mussorgsky, and other Russian composers. These influences, in any event, seem to relinquish to his personal style of melodicism and orchestral color. Rachmaninoff obviously highlighted the piano often in his works. In essence, he employed his pianistic skills to explore the more sensitive potentials of the instrument.
  • Comments

For Oboe and Piano

Title by uploader: Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Oboe and Piano, Op.34 No.14

Read license
24.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.08 Mb ID: SM-000508393 Upload date: 24 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Oboe
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Medium
Duration
6'33
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Oboe and Piano
Intermediate level - Digital Download
Composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943). Arranged by James M. Guthrie, ASCAP. Romantic Period, Repertoire, Technique Training, Wedding, Recital. Score, Set of Parts. 13 pages.
Published by Jmsgu3 Publications S0.336275. Sergei Rachmaninoff: Vocalise Op. 34 No. 14. Score: 7 pages, 41 measures. Duration: ca. 6:33. Solo part: 2 pages, Piano part: 4 pages. Very famous composition with a distinctly melancholy flavor. Suitable for Lent or Easter meditations, receptions, weddings, recitals, school performances, and concert encores.

Vocalise is a song that Sergei Rachmaninoff in fact composed 1915. It represents, as can be seen, the final entry of his 14 Romances, Op. 34. He wrote it generally speaking for high voice with piano accompaniment. There are no words, but with this in mind, it is usually sung on a vowel that the singer chooses. He provided a dedication by and large to the famous soprano Antonina Nezhdanova.

Rachmaninoff Background
Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873 –1943) was a famous Russian concert pianist, and in fact also a composer, during the Romantic period. Some of his compositions are in short among the most famous in the entire Romantic repertoire. Rachmaninoff was born into a musical family on the whole and began studying the piano at only four years of age. In due time, he graduated from Moscow Conservatory in 1892. By then, he had in essence already composed several works for piano and a few orchestral pieces as well. However, In 1897, music critics reacted negatively to his first symphony. As a result, Rachmaninoff was clinically depressed for four years. During this time, he composed very little. Eventually, successful therapy allowed him to complete his Piano Concerto No. 2. In contrast, it was ardently received by the critics. Rachmaninoff conducted at the Bolshoi Theatre, then eventually relocated to Dresden, Germany. During this time, he first toured the United States

Move to America
Rachmaninoff and his family meanwhile left Russia following the Russian Revolution in 1918. They settled, to begin with, in New York City. He performed on the piano and by and large conducted performances of his music for a living. For a while, his busy tour schedule meant he had, on the whole, no time to compose. In fact, between 1918 and 1943, he finished just six works, including Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Symphony No. 3, and Symphonic Dances. Generally speaking, he moved to Beverly Hills in 1942 for health reasons. Rachmaninoff was granted American citizenship ultimately one month before he died.

Legacy
In Rachmaninoff's compositions, we see all in all the early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev, Mussorgsky, and other Russian composers. These influences, in any event, seem to relinquish to his personal style of melodicism and orchestral color. Rachmaninoff obviously highlighted the piano often in his works. In essence, he employed his pianistic skills to explore the more sensitive potentials of the instrument.
  • Comments

For Oboe d'Amore and Piano

Title by uploader: Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Oboe d'Amore and Piano, Op.34 No.14

Read license
24.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.09 Mb ID: SM-000508394 Upload date: 24 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Oboe d'amore
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Medium
Duration
6'33
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Oboe d'Amore and Piano
Intermediate level - Digital Download
Composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943). Arranged by James M. Guthrie, ASCAP. Romantic Period, Repertoire, Technique Training, Wedding, Recital. Score, Set of Parts. 13 pages.
Published by Jmsgu3 Publications S0.336271. Sergei Rachmaninoff: Vocalise Op. 34 No. 14. Score: 7 pages, 41 measures. Duration: ca. 6:33. Solo part: 2 pages, Piano part: 4 pages. Very famous composition with a distinctly melancholy flavor. Suitable for Lent or Easter meditations, receptions, weddings, recitals, school performances, and concert encores.

Vocalise is a song that Sergei Rachmaninoff in fact composed 1915. It represents, as can be seen, the final entry of his 14 Romances, Op. 34. He wrote it generally speaking for high voice with piano accompaniment. There are no words, but with this in mind, it is usually sung on a vowel that the singer chooses. He provided a dedication by and large to the famous soprano Antonina Nezhdanova.

Rachmaninoff Background
Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873 –1943) was a famous Russian concert pianist, and in fact also a composer, during the Romantic period. Some of his compositions are in short among the most famous in the entire Romantic repertoire. Rachmaninoff was born into a musical family on the whole and began studying the piano at only four years of age. In due time, he graduated from Moscow Conservatory in 1892. By then, he had in essence already composed several works for piano and a few orchestral pieces as well. However, In 1897, music critics reacted negatively to his first symphony. As a result, Rachmaninoff was clinically depressed for four years. During this time, he composed very little. Eventually, successful therapy allowed him to complete his Piano Concerto No. 2. In contrast, it was ardently received by the critics. Rachmaninoff conducted at the Bolshoi Theatre, then eventually relocated to Dresden, Germany. During this time, he first toured the United States

Move to America
Rachmaninoff and his family meanwhile left Russia following the Russian Revolution in 1918. They settled, to begin with, in New York City. He performed on the piano and by and large conducted performances of his music for a living. For a while, his busy tour schedule meant he had, on the whole, no time to compose. In fact, between 1918 and 1943, he finished just six works, including Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Symphony No. 3, and Symphonic Dances. Generally speaking, he moved to Beverly Hills in 1942 for health reasons. Rachmaninoff was granted American citizenship ultimately one month before he died.

Legacy
In Rachmaninoff's compositions, we see all in all the early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev, Mussorgsky, and other Russian composers. These influences, in any event, seem to relinquish to his personal style of melodicism and orchestral color. Rachmaninoff obviously highlighted the piano often in his works. In essence, he employed his pianistic skills to explore the more sensitive potentials of the instrument.
  • Comments

For Piccolo and Piano

Title by uploader: Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Piccolo and Piano, Op.34 No.14

Read license
24.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.07 Mb ID: SM-000508395 Upload date: 24 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Flute piccolo
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Medium
Duration
6'33
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Piccolo and Piano
Intermediate level - Digital Download
Composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943). Arranged by James M. Guthrie, ASCAP. Romantic Period, Repertoire, Technique Training, Wedding, Recital. Score, Set of Parts. 13 pages.
Published by Jmsgu3 Publications S0.336263 . Sergei Rachmaninoff: Vocalise Op. 34 No. 14. Score: 7 pages, 41 measures. Duration: ca. 6:33. Solo part: 2 pages, Piano part: 4 pages. Very famous composition with a distinctly melancholy flavor. Suitable for Lent or Easter meditations, receptions, weddings, recitals, school performances, and concert encores.

Vocalise is a song that Sergei Rachmaninoff in fact composed 1915. It represents, as can be seen, the final entry of his 14 Romances, Op. 34. He wrote it generally speaking for high voice with piano accompaniment. There are no words, but with this in mind, it is usually sung on a vowel that the singer chooses. He provided a dedication by and large to the famous soprano Antonina Nezhdanova.

Rachmaninoff Background
Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873 –1943) was a famous Russian concert pianist, and in fact also a composer, during the Romantic period. Some of his compositions are in short among the most famous in the entire Romantic repertoire. Rachmaninoff was born into a musical family on the whole and began studying the piano at only four years of age. In due time, he graduated from Moscow Conservatory in 1892. By then, he had in essence already composed several works for piano and a few orchestral pieces as well. However, In 1897, music critics reacted negatively to his first symphony. As a result, Rachmaninoff was clinically depressed for four years. During this time, he composed very little. Eventually, successful therapy allowed him to complete his Piano Concerto No. 2. In contrast, it was ardently received by the critics. Rachmaninoff conducted at the Bolshoi Theatre, then eventually relocated to Dresden, Germany. During this time, he first toured the United States

Move to America
Rachmaninoff and his family meanwhile left Russia following the Russian Revolution in 1918. They settled, to begin with, in New York City. He performed on the piano and by and large conducted performances of his music for a living. For a while, his busy tour schedule meant he had, on the whole, no time to compose. In fact, between 1918 and 1943, he finished just six works, including Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Symphony No. 3, and Symphonic Dances. Generally speaking, he moved to Beverly Hills in 1942 for health reasons. Rachmaninoff was granted American citizenship ultimately one month before he died.

Legacy
In Rachmaninoff's compositions, we see all in all the early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev, Mussorgsky, and other Russian composers. These influences, in any event, seem to relinquish to his personal style of melodicism and orchestral color. Rachmaninoff obviously highlighted the piano often in his works. In essence, he employed his pianistic skills to explore the more sensitive potentials of the instrument.
  • Comments

For Soprano Sax and Piano

Title by uploader: Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Soprano Sax and Piano, Op.34 No.14

Read license
24.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.09 Mb ID: SM-000508396 Upload date: 24 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Soprano Saxophone
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Medium
Duration
6'33
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Soprano Sax and Piano
Intermediate level - Digital Download
Composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943). Arranged by James M. Guthrie, ASCAP. Romantic Period, Repertoire, Technique Training, Wedding, Recital. Score, Set of Parts. 13 pages.
Published by Jmsgu3 Publications S0.336261. Sergei Rachmaninoff: Vocalise Op. 34 No. 14. Score: 7 pages, 41 measures. Duration: ca. 6:33. Solo part: 2 pages, Piano part: 4 pages. Very famous composition with a distinctly melancholy flavor. Suitable for Lent or Easter meditations, receptions, weddings, recitals, school performances, and concert encores.

Vocalise is a song that Sergei Rachmaninoff in fact composed 1915. It represents, as can be seen, the final entry of his 14 Romances, Op. 34. He wrote it generally speaking for high voice with piano accompaniment. There are no words, but with this in mind, it is usually sung on a vowel that the singer chooses. He provided a dedication by and large to the famous soprano Antonina Nezhdanova.

Rachmaninoff Background
Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873 –1943) was a famous Russian concert pianist, and in fact also a composer, during the Romantic period. Some of his compositions are in short among the most famous in the entire Romantic repertoire. Rachmaninoff was born into a musical family on the whole and began studying the piano at only four years of age. In due time, he graduated from Moscow Conservatory in 1892. By then, he had in essence already composed several works for piano and a few orchestral pieces as well. However, In 1897, music critics reacted negatively to his first symphony. As a result, Rachmaninoff was clinically depressed for four years. During this time, he composed very little. Eventually, successful therapy allowed him to complete his Piano Concerto No. 2. In contrast, it was ardently received by the critics. Rachmaninoff conducted at the Bolshoi Theatre, then eventually relocated to Dresden, Germany. During this time, he first toured the United States

Move to America
Rachmaninoff and his family meanwhile left Russia following the Russian Revolution in 1918. They settled, to begin with, in New York City. He performed on the piano and by and large conducted performances of his music for a living. For a while, his busy tour schedule meant he had, on the whole, no time to compose. In fact, between 1918 and 1943, he finished just six works, including Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Symphony No. 3, and Symphonic Dances. Generally speaking, he moved to Beverly Hills in 1942 for health reasons. Rachmaninoff was granted American citizenship ultimately one month before he died.

Legacy
In Rachmaninoff's compositions, we see all in all the early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev, Mussorgsky, and other Russian composers. These influences, in any event, seem to relinquish to his personal style of melodicism and orchestral color. Rachmaninoff obviously highlighted the piano often in his works. In essence, he employed his pianistic skills to explore the more sensitive potentials of the instrument.
  • Comments

For Tuba and Piano

Title by uploader: Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Tuba and Piano, Op.34 No.14

Read license
24.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.09 Mb ID: SM-000508397 Upload date: 24 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Tuba
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Medium
Duration
6'33
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Tuba and Piano
Intermediate level - Digital Download
Composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943). Arranged by James M. Guthrie, ASCAP. Romantic Period, Repertoire, Technique Training, Wedding, Recital. Score, Set of Parts. 13 pages.
Published by Jmsgu3 Publications S0.336217. Sergei Rachmaninoff: Vocalise Op. 34 No. 14. Score: 7 pages, 41 measures. Duration: ca. 6:33. Solo part: 2 pages, Piano part: 4 pages. Very famous composition with a distinctly melancholy flavor. Suitable for Lent or Easter meditations, receptions, weddings, recitals, school performances, and concert encores.

Vocalise is a song that Sergei Rachmaninoff in fact composed 1915. It represents, as can be seen, the final entry of his 14 Romances, Op. 34. He wrote it generally speaking for high voice with piano accompaniment. There are no words, but with this in mind, it is usually sung on a vowel that the singer chooses. He provided a dedication by and large to the famous soprano Antonina Nezhdanova.

Rachmaninoff Background
Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873 –1943) was a famous Russian concert pianist, and in fact also a composer, during the Romantic period. Some of his compositions are in short among the most famous in the entire Romantic repertoire. Rachmaninoff was born into a musical family on the whole and began studying the piano at only four years of age. In due time, he graduated from Moscow Conservatory in 1892. By then, he had in essence already composed several works for piano and a few orchestral pieces as well. However, In 1897, music critics reacted negatively to his first symphony. As a result, Rachmaninoff was clinically depressed for four years. During this time, he composed very little. Eventually, successful therapy allowed him to complete his Piano Concerto No. 2. In contrast, it was ardently received by the critics. Rachmaninoff conducted at the Bolshoi Theatre, then eventually relocated to Dresden, Germany. During this time, he first toured the United States

Move to America
Rachmaninoff and his family meanwhile left Russia following the Russian Revolution in 1918. They settled, to begin with, in New York City. He performed on the piano and by and large conducted performances of his music for a living. For a while, his busy tour schedule meant he had, on the whole, no time to compose. In fact, between 1918 and 1943, he finished just six works, including Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Symphony No. 3, and Symphonic Dances. Generally speaking, he moved to Beverly Hills in 1942 for health reasons. Rachmaninoff was granted American citizenship ultimately one month before he died.

Legacy
In Rachmaninoff's compositions, we see all in all the early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev, Mussorgsky, and other Russian composers. These influences, in any event, seem to relinquish to his personal style of melodicism and orchestral color. Rachmaninoff obviously highlighted the piano often in his works. In essence, he employed his pianistic skills to explore the more sensitive potentials of the instrument.
  • Comments

For Trumpet and Piano

Title by uploader: Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Trumpet and Piano, Op.34 No.14

Read license
24.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.09 Mb ID: SM-000508398 Upload date: 24 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Trumpet
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Medium
Duration
6'33
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Trumpet and Piano
Intermediate level - Digital Download
Composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943). Arranged by James M. Guthrie, ASCAP. Romantic Period, Repertoire, Technique Training, Wedding, Recital. Score, Set of Parts. 13 pages.
Published by Jmsgu3 Publications S0.336215. Sergei Rachmaninoff: Vocalise Op. 34 No. 14. Score: 7 pages, 41 measures. Duration: ca. 6:33. Solo part: 2 pages, Piano part: 4 pages. Very famous composition with a distinctly melancholy flavor. Suitable for Lent or Easter meditations, receptions, weddings, recitals, school performances, and concert encores.

Vocalise is a song that Sergei Rachmaninoff in fact composed 1915. It represents, as can be seen, the final entry of his 14 Romances, Op. 34. He wrote it generally speaking for high voice with piano accompaniment. There are no words, but with this in mind, it is usually sung on a vowel that the singer chooses. He provided a dedication by and large to the famous soprano Antonina Nezhdanova.

Rachmaninoff Background
Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873 –1943) was a famous Russian concert pianist, and in fact also a composer, during the Romantic period. Some of his compositions are in short among the most famous in the entire Romantic repertoire. Rachmaninoff was born into a musical family on the whole and began studying the piano at only four years of age. In due time, he graduated from Moscow Conservatory in 1892. By then, he had in essence already composed several works for piano and a few orchestral pieces as well. However, In 1897, music critics reacted negatively to his first symphony. As a result, Rachmaninoff was clinically depressed for four years. During this time, he composed very little. Eventually, successful therapy allowed him to complete his Piano Concerto No. 2. In contrast, it was ardently received by the critics. Rachmaninoff conducted at the Bolshoi Theatre, then eventually relocated to Dresden, Germany. During this time, he first toured the United States

Move to America
Rachmaninoff and his family meanwhile left Russia following the Russian Revolution in 1918. They settled, to begin with, in New York City. He performed on the piano and by and large conducted performances of his music for a living. For a while, his busy tour schedule meant he had, on the whole, no time to compose. In fact, between 1918 and 1943, he finished just six works, including Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Symphony No. 3, and Symphonic Dances. Generally speaking, he moved to Beverly Hills in 1942 for health reasons. Rachmaninoff was granted American citizenship ultimately one month before he died.

Legacy
In Rachmaninoff's compositions, we see all in all the early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev, Mussorgsky, and other Russian composers. These influences, in any event, seem to relinquish to his personal style of melodicism and orchestral color. Rachmaninoff obviously highlighted the piano often in his works. In essence, he employed his pianistic skills to explore the more sensitive potentials of the instrument.
  • Comments

For Trombone and Piano

Title by uploader: Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Trombone and Piano, Op.34 No.14

Read license
24.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.08 Mb ID: SM-000508399 Upload date: 24 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Trombone
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Duration
6'33
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Trombone and Piano
Intermediate level - Digital Download
Composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943). Arranged by James M. Guthrie, ASCAP. Romantic Period, Repertoire, Technique Training, Wedding, Recital. Score, Set of Parts. 13 pages.
Published by Jmsgu3 Publications S0.336209. Sergei Rachmaninoff: Vocalise Op. 34 No. 14. Score: 7 pages, 41 measures. Duration: ca. 6:33. Solo part: 2 pages, Piano part: 4 pages. Very famous composition with a distinctly melancholy flavor. Suitable for Lent or Easter meditations, receptions, weddings, recitals, school performances, and concert encores.

Vocalise is a song that Sergei Rachmaninoff in fact composed 1915. It represents, as can be seen, the final entry of his 14 Romances, Op. 34. He wrote it generally speaking for high voice with piano accompaniment. There are no words, but with this in mind, it is usually sung on a vowel that the singer chooses. He provided a dedication by and large to the famous soprano Antonina Nezhdanova.

Rachmaninoff Background
Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873 –1943) was a famous Russian concert pianist, and in fact also a composer, during the Romantic period. Some of his compositions are in short among the most famous in the entire Romantic repertoire. Rachmaninoff was born into a musical family on the whole and began studying the piano at only four years of age. In due time, he graduated from Moscow Conservatory in 1892. By then, he had in essence already composed several works for piano and a few orchestral pieces as well. However, In 1897, music critics reacted negatively to his first symphony. As a result, Rachmaninoff was clinically depressed for four years. During this time, he composed very little. Eventually, successful therapy allowed him to complete his Piano Concerto No. 2. In contrast, it was ardently received by the critics. Rachmaninoff conducted at the Bolshoi Theatre, then eventually relocated to Dresden, Germany. During this time, he first toured the United States

Move to America
Rachmaninoff and his family meanwhile left Russia following the Russian Revolution in 1918. They settled, to begin with, in New York City. He performed on the piano and by and large conducted performances of his music for a living. For a while, his busy tour schedule meant he had, on the whole, no time to compose. In fact, between 1918 and 1943, he finished just six works, including Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Symphony No. 3, and Symphonic Dances. Generally speaking, he moved to Beverly Hills in 1942 for health reasons. Rachmaninoff was granted American citizenship ultimately one month before he died.

Legacy
In Rachmaninoff's compositions, we see all in all the early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev, Mussorgsky, and other Russian composers. These influences, in any event, seem to relinquish to his personal style of melodicism and orchestral color. Rachmaninoff obviously highlighted the piano often in his works. In essence, he employed his pianistic skills to explore the more sensitive potentials of the instrument.
  • Comments

For Tenor Sax and Piano

Title by uploader: Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Tenor Sax and Piano, Op.34 No.14

Read license
24.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.09 Mb ID: SM-000508400 Upload date: 24 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Tenor Saxophone
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Medium
Duration
0'33
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Tenor Sax and Piano
Intermediate level - Digital Download
Composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943). Arranged by James M. Guthrie, ASCAP. Romantic Period, Repertoire, Technique Training, Wedding, Recital. Score, Set of Parts. 13 pages.
Published by Jmsgu3 Publications S0.336205. Sergei Rachmaninoff: Vocalise Op. 34 No. 14. Score: 7 pages, 41 measures. Duration: ca. 6:33. Solo part: 2 pages, Piano part: 4 pages. Very famous composition with a distinctly melancholy flavor. Suitable for Lent or Easter meditations, receptions, weddings, recitals, school performances, and concert encores.

Vocalise is a song that Sergei Rachmaninoff in fact composed 1915. It represents, as can be seen, the final entry of his 14 Romances, Op. 34. He wrote it generally speaking for high voice with piano accompaniment. There are no words, but with this in mind, it is usually sung on a vowel that the singer chooses. He provided a dedication by and large to the famous soprano Antonina Nezhdanova.

Rachmaninoff Background
Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873 –1943) was a famous Russian concert pianist, and in fact also a composer, during the Romantic period. Some of his compositions are in short among the most famous in the entire Romantic repertoire. Rachmaninoff was born into a musical family on the whole and began studying the piano at only four years of age. In due time, he graduated from Moscow Conservatory in 1892. By then, he had in essence already composed several works for piano and a few orchestral pieces as well. However, In 1897, music critics reacted negatively to his first symphony. As a result, Rachmaninoff was clinically depressed for four years. During this time, he composed very little. Eventually, successful therapy allowed him to complete his Piano Concerto No. 2. In contrast, it was ardently received by the critics. Rachmaninoff conducted at the Bolshoi Theatre, then eventually relocated to Dresden, Germany. During this time, he first toured the United States

Move to America
Rachmaninoff and his family meanwhile left Russia following the Russian Revolution in 1918. They settled, to begin with, in New York City. He performed on the piano and by and large conducted performances of his music for a living. For a while, his busy tour schedule meant he had, on the whole, no time to compose. In fact, between 1918 and 1943, he finished just six works, including Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Symphony No. 3, and Symphonic Dances. Generally speaking, he moved to Beverly Hills in 1942 for health reasons. Rachmaninoff was granted American citizenship ultimately one month before he died.

Legacy
In Rachmaninoff's compositions, we see all in all the early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev, Mussorgsky, and other Russian composers. These influences, in any event, seem to relinquish to his personal style of melodicism and orchestral color. Rachmaninoff obviously highlighted the piano often in his works. In essence, he employed his pianistic skills to explore the more sensitive potentials of the instrument.
  • Comments

For Cello and Piano

Title by uploader: Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Cello and Piano, Op.34 No.14

Read license
24.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.09 Mb ID: SM-000508401 Upload date: 24 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Cello
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Medium
Duration
6'33
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Cello and Piano
Intermediate level - Digital Download
Composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943). Arranged by James M. Guthrie, ASCAP. Romantic Period, Repertoire, Technique Training, Wedding, Recital. Score, Set of Parts. 13 pages.
Published by Jmsgu3 Publications S0.335991. Sergei Rachmaninoff: Vocalise Op. 34 No. 14. Score: 7 pages, 41 measures. Duration: ca. 6:33. Solo part: 2 pages, Piano part: 4 pages. Very famous composition with a distinctly melancholy flavor. Suitable for Lent or Easter meditations, receptions, weddings, recitals, school performances, and concert encores.

Vocalise is a song that Sergei Rachmaninoff in fact composed 1915. It represents, as can be seen, the final entry of his 14 Romances, Op. 34. He wrote it generally speaking for high voice with piano accompaniment. There are no words, but with this in mind, it is usually sung on a vowel that the singer chooses. He provided a dedication by and large to the famous soprano Antonina Nezhdanova.

Rachmaninoff Background
Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873 –1943) was a famous Russian concert pianist, and in fact also a composer, during the Romantic period. Some of his compositions are in short among the most famous in the entire Romantic repertoire. Rachmaninoff was born into a musical family on the whole and began studying the piano at only four years of age. In due time, he graduated from Moscow Conservatory in 1892. By then, he had in essence already composed several works for piano and a few orchestral pieces as well. However, In 1897, music critics reacted negatively to his first symphony. As a result, Rachmaninoff was clinically depressed for four years. During this time, he composed very little. Eventually, successful therapy allowed him to complete his Piano Concerto No. 2. In contrast, it was ardently received by the critics. Rachmaninoff conducted at the Bolshoi Theatre, then eventually relocated to Dresden, Germany. During this time, he first toured the United States

Move to America
Rachmaninoff and his family meanwhile left Russia following the Russian Revolution in 1918. They settled, to begin with, in New York City. He performed on the piano and by and large conducted performances of his music for a living. For a while, his busy tour schedule meant he had, on the whole, no time to compose. In fact, between 1918 and 1943, he finished just six works, including Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Symphony No. 3, and Symphonic Dances. Generally speaking, he moved to Beverly Hills in 1942 for health reasons. Rachmaninoff was granted American citizenship ultimately one month before he died.

Legacy
In Rachmaninoff's compositions, we see all in all the early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev, Mussorgsky, and other Russian composers. These influences, in any event, seem to relinquish to his personal style of melodicism and orchestral color. Rachmaninoff obviously highlighted the piano often in his works. In essence, he employed his pianistic skills to explore the more sensitive potentials of the instrument.
  • Comments

For Violin and Piano

Title by uploader: Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Violin and Piano, Op.34 No.14

Read license
24.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 794.1 Kb ID: SM-000508403 Upload date: 24 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Violin
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Medium
Duration
6'33
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Violin and Piano
Intermediate level - Digital Download
Composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943). Arranged by James M. Guthrie, ASCAP. Romantic Period, Repertoire, Technique Training, Wedding, Recital. Score, Set of Parts. 13 pages.
Published by Jmsgu3 Publications S0.336203. Sergei Rachmaninoff: Vocalise Op. 34 No. 14. Score: 7 pages, 41 measures. Duration: ca. 6:33. Solo part: 2 pages, Piano part: 4 pages. Very famous composition with a distinctly melancholy flavor. Suitable for Lent or Easter meditations, receptions, weddings, recitals, school performances, and concert encores.

Vocalise is a song that Sergei Rachmaninoff in fact composed 1915. It represents, as can be seen, the final entry of his 14 Romances, Op. 34. He wrote it generally speaking for high voice with piano accompaniment. There are no words, but with this in mind, it is usually sung on a vowel that the singer chooses. He provided a dedication by and large to the famous soprano Antonina Nezhdanova.

Rachmaninoff Background
Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873 –1943) was a famous Russian concert pianist, and in fact also a composer, during the Romantic period. Some of his compositions are in short among the most famous in the entire Romantic repertoire. Rachmaninoff was born into a musical family on the whole and began studying the piano at only four years of age. In due time, he graduated from Moscow Conservatory in 1892. By then, he had in essence already composed several works for piano and a few orchestral pieces as well. However, In 1897, music critics reacted negatively to his first symphony. As a result, Rachmaninoff was clinically depressed for four years. During this time, he composed very little. Eventually, successful therapy allowed him to complete his Piano Concerto No. 2. In contrast, it was ardently received by the critics. Rachmaninoff conducted at the Bolshoi Theatre, then eventually relocated to Dresden, Germany. During this time, he first toured the United States

Move to America
Rachmaninoff and his family meanwhile left Russia following the Russian Revolution in 1918. They settled, to begin with, in New York City. He performed on the piano and by and large conducted performances of his music for a living. For a while, his busy tour schedule meant he had, on the whole, no time to compose. In fact, between 1918 and 1943, he finished just six works, including Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Symphony No. 3, and Symphonic Dances. Generally speaking, he moved to Beverly Hills in 1942 for health reasons. Rachmaninoff was granted American citizenship ultimately one month before he died.

Legacy
In Rachmaninoff's compositions, we see all in all the early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev, Mussorgsky, and other Russian composers. These influences, in any event, seem to relinquish to his personal style of melodicism and orchestral color. Rachmaninoff obviously highlighted the piano often in his works. In essence, he employed his pianistic skills to explore the more sensitive potentials of the instrument.
  • Comments

For Viola and Piano

Title by uploader: Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Viola and Piano, Op.34 No.14

Read license
24.95 USD

Seller James Guthrie
PDF, 1.08 Mb ID: SM-000508404 Upload date: 24 Jun 2020
Instrumentation
Piano, Viola
Scored for
Solo, Accompanying piano
Type of score
Score for two performers, Parts
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Publisher
Jmsgu3 Publications
Difficulty
Medium
Duration
6'33
Genre
Classical/Vocal music
Rachmaninoff: Vocalise for Viola and Piano
Intermediate level - Digital Download
Composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943). Arranged by James M. Guthrie, ASCAP. Romantic Period, Repertoire, Technique Training, Wedding, Recital. Score, Set of Parts. 13 pages.
Published by Jmsgu3 Publications S0.335481. Sergei Rachmaninoff: Vocalise Op. 34 No. 14. Score: 7 pages, 41 measures. Duration: ca. 6:33. Solo part: 2 pages, Piano part: 4 pages. Very famous composition with a distinctly melancholy flavor. Suitable for Lent or Easter meditations, receptions, weddings, recitals, school performances, and concert encores.

Vocalise is a song that Sergei Rachmaninoff in fact composed 1915. It represents, as can be seen, the final entry of his 14 Romances, Op. 34. He wrote it generally speaking for high voice with piano accompaniment. There are no words, but with this in mind, it is usually sung on a vowel that the singer chooses. He provided a dedication by and large to the famous soprano Antonina Nezhdanova.

Rachmaninoff Background
Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873 –1943) was a famous Russian concert pianist, and in fact also a composer, during the Romantic period. Some of his compositions are in short among the most famous in the entire Romantic repertoire. Rachmaninoff was born into a musical family on the whole and began studying the piano at only four years of age. In due time, he graduated from Moscow Conservatory in 1892. By then, he had in essence already composed several works for piano and a few orchestral pieces as well. However, In 1897, music critics reacted negatively to his first symphony. As a result, Rachmaninoff was clinically depressed for four years. During this time, he composed very little. Eventually, successful therapy allowed him to complete his Piano Concerto No. 2. In contrast, it was ardently received by the critics. Rachmaninoff conducted at the Bolshoi Theatre, then eventually relocated to Dresden, Germany. During this time, he first toured the United States

Move to America
Rachmaninoff and his family meanwhile left Russia following the Russian Revolution in 1918. They settled, to begin with, in New York City. He performed on the piano and by and large conducted performances of his music for a living. For a while, his busy tour schedule meant he had, on the whole, no time to compose. In fact, between 1918 and 1943, he finished just six works, including Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Symphony No. 3, and Symphonic Dances. Generally speaking, he moved to Beverly Hills in 1942 for health reasons. Rachmaninoff was granted American citizenship ultimately one month before he died.

Legacy
In Rachmaninoff's compositions, we see all in all the early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev, Mussorgsky, and other Russian composers. These influences, in any event, seem to relinquish to his personal style of melodicism and orchestral color. Rachmaninoff obviously highlighted the piano often in his works. In essence, he employed his pianistic skills to explore the more sensitive potentials of the instrument.
  • Comments

For solo and chamber orcehstra

Title by uploader: С. Рахманинов Вокализ, Oр.34 No.14


9.00 USD

PDF, 1.06 Mb ID: SM-000527989 Upload date: 19 Aug 2021
Instrumentation
Violin, Viola, Cello, Double bass
Scored for
Solo, Chamber orchestra
Type of score
Full score, Parts
Key
C sharp minor
Movement(s)
1 to 1 from 1
Arranger
Alexander Martynenko
Publisher
Alexander Martynenko
Difficulty
Medium
Duration
6'10
Year of composition
2009
Genre
Classical/Piece
Соло виолончели с камерным оркестром. Партитура и оркестровые партии
  • Comments

For piano

Printable sheet music file, 1 copy • 4 pages, ID: SM-000196660
4.99
 
USD
Instrumentation
Piano
Scored for
1 piano, 4 hands
Genre
Classical
  • Comments

For piano

Printable sheet music file, 1 copy • 4 pages, ID: SM-000196677
3.99
 
USD
Instrumentation
Piano
Difficulty
Easy
Genre
Classical
  • Comments

For piano

Printable sheet music file, 1 copy • 4 pages, ID: SM-000196696
3.99
 
USD
Instrumentation
Piano
Genre
Classical
  • Comments

For piano

Printable sheet music file, 1 copy • 3 pages, ID: SM-000196658
4.99
 
USD
Instrumentation
Piano
Genre
Classical
  • Comments

For piano

Printable sheet music file, 1 copy • 3 pages, ID: SM-000199862
3.99
 
USD
Instrumentation
Piano
Difficulty
Easy
Genre
Classical
  • Comments

For violin and piano

Printable sheet music file, 1 copy • 5 pages, ID: SM-000361132
2.99
 
USD
Instrumentation
Piano, Violin
Genre
Classical
  • Comments

For piano

Printable sheet music file, 1 copy • 6 pages, ID: SM-000460427
4.99
 
USD
Instrumentation
Piano
Arranger
Vyacheslav Gryaznov
Genre
Classical
  • Comments

For piano

Title by uploader: Vocalise, Op.34 No.4


5.00 USD

Seller Pierre Carier
PDF, 255.8 Kb ID: SM-000542332 Upload date: 21 Nov 2022
Instrumentation
Piano
Scored for
Solo
Type of score
Piano score
Arranger
Alexander Siloti
Difficulty
Difficult
Genre
Classical/Instrumental
Vocalise Opus 34, Nr. 4 arranged by Alexander Siloti
  • Comments
comments Sandra Jackson 16 Apr 2019 13:44

A well-written score it is. Love this beautiful pianistic transcription a lot as it performs a good job of converting the original sound into just piano without losing all the savvy complexities of the original patternsm harmonies and melody. I'm still in the process of learning the composition but I already fell it's gonna be a rewarding challenge in my personal way through it. The difficulty is moderate, not skyhard to get it going in no time.

comments Mikhail Zeiger 06 Jul 2018 21:33

The arrangement was commissioned and premiered by Russian Chamber Chorus of New York

 
 
   
   
 
 
   
 
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